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Fiske- DE-143 - History

Fiske- DE-143 - History


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Fiske

Bradley Allen Fiske, born 13 June 1864 in Lyons, New York, was a member of the Naval Academy class of 1874. In addition to serving with distinction at sea and ashore, Fiske advanced the' Navy with electrical and ordnance inventions of great significance. One of the earliest to understand the revolutionary possibilities of naval aviation, he wrote a number of books of important effect in gaining a wider understanding of the modern Navy by the public. Rear Admiral Fiske died in Yew York City 6 April 1942.

I
(DE-143: dp. 1,200; 1. 306'; b. 36'7", dr. 8'7";
s. 21 k.; cpl. 186; a. 3 3", 3 21" tt., 8 dcp., 1 dcp.
(hh.), 2 dct.; cl. Edsall)

The first Fiske (DE-143) was launched 14 March 1943 by Consolidated Steel Corp., Orange, Tex.; sponsored by Mrs. H. G. Chalkley, and commissioned 25 - August 1943, Lieutenant Commander R. P. Walker in command.

Fiske began her service as a convoy escort with a voyage from Norfolk to Coco Solo C.Z., to New York between 12 and 25 November 1913. On 3 December,
the escort ship cleared Norfolk on the first of three convoy assignments from Norfolk and New York to Casablanca. During the third of these, on 20 April
1944, her convoy came under attack by German torpedo bombers in the western Mediterranean, but none, of the enemy planes came within range of Fiske.

Completing her Casablanca runs with her return to New York 21 May 1944, Fiske joined the hunter-killer' group formed around Wake Island (CVE-65) at Norfolk 10 June. Five days later her group sailed to patrol across the Atlantic, putting into Casablanca to replenish 20 to 24 July. On 2 August, during a special hunt for submarines known to be transmitting weather information from stations in the central AtIantic, Fiske and Douglas L. Howard (DE-138) were detached from the task group to investigate a visual contact both had made. The contact, surfaced U - 04, quickly dived, but the two escorts picked it up on sonar, and began their attack approach. Suddenly, Fiske was torpedoed on her starboard side amidships, and within 10 minutes, she broke in two and had to be abandoned. Thirty of her men were killed and 50 badly wounded by the explosion, but all who survived it were rescued by Farquhar (DE-139).

Fiske received one battle star for World War II service.


USS Fiske (i) (DE 143)


US Naval Historical Center Photograph #NH53909

On 2 August 1944, USS Fiske was part of the hunter-killer Task Group 22.6 formed around the escort carrier USS Wake Island (CVE 65) when she was hit on starboard side amidships by a Gnat homing torpedo from U-804, broke in two and sank about 800 nautical miles east of Cape Race, Newfoundland in position 47º11'N, 33º29'W. 33 crew members were lost. The survivors, among them the commander and 50 wounded men, were picked up by the destroyer escort USS Farquhar (DE 139) and taken to Argentia.

Hit by U-boat
Sunk on 2 Aug 1944 by U-804 (Meyer).

Commands listed for USS Fiske (i) (DE 143)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1T/Cdr. Robert Power Walker, USN25 Aug 194320 Jan 1944
2John Alfred Comly, USNR20 Jan 19442 Aug 1944

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U-Boat Attack Logs
Daniel Morgan and Bruce Taylor


Contents

Fiske was laid down 4 January 1943 by the Consolidated Steel Corporation of Orange, Texas launched 14 March 1943 sponsored by Mrs. H. G. Chalkley and commissioned 25 August 1943 with Lieutenant Commander R. P. Walker in command. Fiske began her service as a convoy escort with a voyage from Norfolk to Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone to New York between 12 and 25 November 1943. On 3 December, the escort ship cleared Norfolk on the first of three convoy assignments from Norfolk and New York to Casablanca. During the third of these, on 20 April 1944 her convoy came under attack by German torpedo bombers in the western Mediterranean, but none of the enemy planes came within range of Fiske.

Completing her Casablanca runs with her return to New York on 21 May 1944 Fiske joined the hunter-killer group formed around USS   Wake Island at Norfolk on 10 June. Five days later her group sailed to patrol across the Atlantic, putting into Casablanca to replenish 20 to 24 July. On 2 August, during a special hunt for submarines known to be transmitting weather information from stations in the central Atlantic, Fiske and USS   Douglas L. Howard were detached from the task group to investigate a visual contact both had made. The contact (north of the Azores), surfaced U-804, quickly dived, but the two escorts picked it up on sonar, and began their attack approach. Suddenly, Fiske was torpedoed on her starboard side amidships, and within 10 minutes, she broke in two and had to be abandoned. Thirty-three of her men were killed and 50 badly wounded by the explosion, but all who survived it were rescued by USS   Farquhar.

Fiske received one battle star for World War II service.


Генеалогия и история семьи Fiske

Many Fisk and Fiske families can trace their lineage to around 1200 to Eastern England, and there are several theories for the ancient origin of the names. One theory suggests that in all probability the Fisk and Fiske names originated in Scandinavia. The name Fisk means fish in Norwegian, Swedish, and Frisian. (In the 5th century the tribe of the Frisians inhabited the whole North Sea coast from the Rhine to the Elbe, and probably exercised some influence on the languages of the other tribes in that area.) Fiske is a Danish alternative spelling for fish. The Vikings invaded eastern England around 800, and many settled there. Many present-day Fisk and Fiske families can trace their roots to the eastern counties of Suffolk and Norfolk in England.

Another theory suggests the original name was Fisc, which is an older form of Fish. Others suggest the name Fisc had to do with tax collection, so they may have been tax collectors.

Yet another theory maintains the names Fisk or Fiske were named after a profession, namely a fisherman, or the name could have come from a place connected with fishing.


Fiske- DE-143 - History

USS Fiske , a 1200-ton Edsall (FMR) class escort ship built at Orange, Texas, was commissioned in late August 1943. During the last two months of that year, and the first five months of 1944, she was employed escorting convoys between the U.S. East Coast and the Panama Canal Zone, and across the Atlantic to North Africa. In June she became part of an anti-submarine group centered on the escort aircraft carrier Wake Island (CVE-65), which operated in the central Atlantic. On 2 August 1944, while in action with the German submarine U-804 , USS Fiske was torpedoed amidships, broke in two and sank. Thirty of her crew members were lost with her.

USS Fiske was named in honor of Rear Admiral Bradley A. Fiske (1854-1942).

This page features all the views we have concerning USS Fiske (DE-143).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway in New York Harbor, 20 October 1943.

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1967.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 61KB 740 x 615 pixels

Broken in two and sinking in the Atlantic Ocean on 2 August 1944, after she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-804 .
Note men abandoning ship by walking down the side of her capsizing bow section.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 149KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Ship's bow floating in the North Atlantic on 2 August 1944, after she was broken in two by a torpedo from the German submarine U-804 .
Photographed from an airplane based on USS Wake Island (CVE-65).
Note sonar dome on Fiske 's keel.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 37KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Ship's stern floating in the North Atlantic on 2 August 1944, after she was broken in two by a torpedo from the German submarine U-804 . This section had to be sunk by gunfire.
Photographed from an airplane based on USS Wake Island (CVE-65).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 84KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Ready for launching, at the Consolidated Steel Corporation shipyard, Orange, Texas, on 14 March 1943.


Fiske- DE-143 - History

The following DEs were destroyed or damaged beyond repair and were removed from US Navy service, thus "Lost". DEs that were damaged but returned to service are not listed here.

Various resources offer conflicting data as to the number of men lost on DEs 136 and 682. The numbers presented here are based upon the comparison of resources and additonal information provided by Pat Perrella, USS Slater volunteer.

October 22, 2002 - Pat Perrella provided the following information:
The figures I was able to substantiate while working with the F. C. DAVIS survivors, including
Dr. Lundeberg, are : Total crew 192 - Total listed as dead or missing 115 (including the CO, XO and 9 other officers) 77 survivors including 3 officers.
Don Kruse, an UNDERHILL survivor is one of our USS Slater volunteers and he stands firmly behind the figure of 112 KIA during the 24 July 1945 sinking.

See the Roll of Honor for the names of DE sailors lost in service aboard ship

(1) former credit for the torpedo attack was given to U-765. USS Donnell was returned to USN service, but as IX-182

Sources:
Blair, Clay (1998). Hitler's U-Boat War, The Hunted 1942-1945. Random House, NY
Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships, Naval History Division, Department of the Navy, Washington.
Andrews, Lewis M., Jr. (1999) Tempest, Fire & Foe, Destroyer Escorts in World War II and The Men Who Manned Them. Narwhal Press, Charleston, SC.
Philip K. Lundeberg, Phd. is Curator Emeritus of Naval History at the Smithsonian Instutition. He received his doctorate from Harvard and joined the Institution after teaching at St. Olaf and the US Naval Academy. He first probed "Operation Teardrop" events in May 1945 interviewing fellow survivors of FREDERICK C. DAVIS DE-136 prior to preparation of numerous condolence letters and its final action report.
US Navy official reports


John Fiske

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John Fiske, original name Edmund Fisk Green, (born March 30, 1842, Hartford, Conn., U.S.—died July 4, 1901, East Gloucester, Mass.), American historian and philosopher who popularized European evolutionary theory in the United States.

After graduating from Harvard Law School in 1865, Fiske briefly practiced law in Boston before turning to writing. In 1860 he had encountered Herbert Spencer’s adaptation of the evolutionary theory of Charles Darwin to aspects of philosophy. Deeply impressed by their ideas, he attempted to incorporate them into his own writings. A visit to Europe (1873–74) provided him the opportunity to meet and talk at length with Darwin, Spencer, and T.H. Huxley. The result was the publication, in 1874, of Fiske’s Outlines of Cosmic Philosophy, an exposition of evolutionary doctrine that was well received both at home and abroad. About 1880 his interests turned to American history as interpreted in the light of evolutionary theory, and from 1885 to 1900 he lectured and published voluminous works on the American colonial and revolutionary periods.

The same belief in inevitable progress through evolutionary change prevailed in Fiske’s interpretation of American history in such works as The Critical Period of American History, 1783–1789 (1888). His primary contribution to American thought was popularizing the evolutionary thesis against the adamant opposition of the churches, however.


Tuesday, June 22, 2010

USS Fiske (DE-143)


Figure 1: USS Fiske (DE-143) ready for launching, at the Consolidated Steel Corporation shipyard, Orange, Texas, on 14 March 1943. Official US Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: USS Fiske (DE-143) underway in New York Harbor, 20 October 1943. Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1967. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: USS Fiske (DE-143) broken in two and sinking in the Atlantic Ocean on 2 August 1944, after she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-804. Note men abandoning ship by walking down the side of her capsizing bow section. Official US Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 4: USS Fiske’s (DE-143) bow floating in the North Atlantic on 2 August 1944, after she was broken in two by a torpedo from the German submarine U-804. This photograph was taken from an airplane based on USS Wake Island (CVE-65). Note sonar dome on Fiske's keel. Official US Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 5: USS Fiske’s (DE-143) stern floating in the North Atlantic on 2 August 1944, after she was broken in two by a torpedo from the German submarine U-804. This section had to be sunk by gunfire. This photograph was taken from an airplane based on USS Wake Island (CVE-65). Official US Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 6: Portrait of Rear Admiral Bradley A. Fiske (1854-1942), USN, and the namesake of USS Fiske (DE-143). Oil painting by Orlando Lagman, 1965. Rear Admiral Fiske was one of the Navy's most technically astute officers, fought at the Battle of Manila Bay on board the gunboat USS Petrel, and served on a number of warships in America’s new steel navy. During his very active career, Fiske invented a large number of electrical and mechanical devices, with both Naval and civilian uses, and wrote extensively on technical and professional issues. Courtesy of the US Navy Art Collection, Washington, DC, and the US Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.

Named after Rear Admiral Bradley A. Fiske (1854-1942), a famous inventor and author who served in America’s new steel navy, USS Fiske (DE-143) was a 1,200-ton Edsall class destroyer escort that was built by the Consolidated Steel Corporation at Orange, Texas, and was commissioned on 25 August 1943. The ship was approximately 306 feet long and 37 feet wide, had a top speed of 21 knots, and had a crew of 186 officers and men. Fiske was armed with three 3-inch guns, one twin 40-mm gun mount, eight 20-mm cannons, three 21-inch torpedo tubes, one Hedgehog depth-charge projector, eight Mk. 6 depth-charge projectors, and two Mk. 9 depth-charge tracks.

Fiske began her career as a convoy escort when she escorted merchant ships from Norfolk, Virginia, to Coco Solo, Panama Canal Zone, and then back north to New York from 12 to 25 November 1943. On 3 December, Fiske left Norfolk for the first of three convoy assignments that took her from New York to Casablanca, Morocco. On 20 April 1944, during her third trip to North Africa, Fiske’s convoy was attacked by German torpedo bombers in the western Mediterranean, but Fiske was not damaged.

After returning to New York on 21 May 1944, Fiske was ordered to leave New York and join a “hunter-killer” group that was being formed at Norfolk around the escort carrier USS Wake Island (CVE-65). Fiske arrived at Norfolk on 10 June.

A “hunter-killer” group was a small task force that was usually comprised of one escort carrier and several destroyers or destroyer escorts. Their sole purpose was to seek out and destroy German U-boats. The hunter-killer group escorted a convoy and the planes on board the escort carrier would search for any U-boats that were approaching the convoy on the surface. The surface escorts in the hunter-killer group would pursue any submerged U-boats using their sonar and would usually attack the submarines with their depth charges. The goal was to sink the U-boats before they had a chance to reach the convoy. Hunter-killer groups became extremely effective in sinking German submarines, but they also were very dangerous assignments because the U-boats still had the capacity to fight back with their torpedoes, turning the hunters into the hunted.

Fiske and the other ships in her hunter-killer group left Norfolk on 15 June 1944. The task force arrived at Casablanca on 20 July and remained there until 24 July. On 2 August, Fiske and the destroyer escort USS Douglas L. Howard (DE-138) were detached from the hunter-killer group and sent to pursue a German submarine that was transmitting weather information in the central Atlantic. After reaching the patrol area, both ships spotted a surfaced German submarine, U-804. After seeing the American warships, U-804 quickly submerged and tried to leave the area. The two American destroyer escorts began their search patterns for the U-boat using their sonar equipment. Suddenly, a torpedo slammed into Fiske on her starboard side amidships and a tremendous explosion followed. After only ten minutes, Fiske broke in two and had to be abandoned. The bow section of the ship sank, but the stern section somehow remained afloat and had to be sunk by gunfire. Thirty crewmembers were killed in the blast and 50 others were seriously injured. All of the survivors were picked up by the destroyer escort USS Farquhar (DE-139), which had arrived on the scene.

USS Fiske had been in commission for less than a year before it was sunk, but she nevertheless received one battle star for her service in World War II. Even though some of their escorts were sunk by U-boats, the hunter-killer groups were very successful in sinking a large number of German submarines. They were one of the major reasons why the Allies eventually won the Battle of the Atlantic.


Fiske- DE-143 - History

According to our records New Jersey was his home or enlistment state and Monmouth County included within the archival record. We have Freehold listed as the city. He had enlisted in the United States Navy. Served during World War II. Askew had the rank of Enlisted. His military occupation or specialty was Steward's Mate Second Class. Service number assignment was 8117999. Attached to USS Fiske (DE-143). During his service in World War II, Navy enlisted man Askew was reported missing and ultimately declared dead on August 2, 1944 . Recorded circumstances attributed to: Missing in action or lost at sea. Theodore Askew was aboard USS Fiske (DE-143) during escort duty to Casablanca, North Africa. On August 2, 1944, a submarine was detected and the Fiske and one other destroyer escort went to attack. The submarine, U-804, fired a torpedo which broke the Fiske into two parts, leading to the death of several dozen men, including Askew. Two months later, the U-804 was lost with all hands on another mission. Theodore Askew is buried or memorialized at Tablets of the Missing at Cambridge American Cemetery, Cambridge, England. This is an American Battle Monuments Commission location.

Rare historical photos of the Standing Rock Sioux

White Bull, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, poses in front of the Missouri River, near Fort Yates, North Dakota, circa 1910.

More than a century ago, Frank Bennett Fiske had a photography studio at Fort Yates, a US Army post in the middle of a North Dakota Indian reservation.

He made his money photographing cavalry soldiers and their families, but it is his rarely seen photos of Native Americans that offer a fascinating glimpse of a bygone era.

“They show a proud people during a period of difficult and often painful transition,” Rod Slemmons writes in “The Standing Rock Portraits,” a new book featuring Fiske’s work from the early 20th century. “Through the glass of Frank Fiske’s negatives lies an abundance of information and understanding.”

Kicks Iron, a member of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, wears a headdress of golden eagle feathers.

Joe No Heart, who was often called “Medicine Joe” by his Fort Yates neighbors, wears an eagle feather in his hair.

Mrs. Twin carries her daughter on her back.

Sharp Bull Horn wears a breast ornament of cow bone hair pipe.

The people in the photos are part of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, which was recently in the news for its protests of the Dakota Access Pipeline. These images were taken not long after the Sioux Wars, which included the famous Battle of Little Bighorn, also known as Custer’s Last Stand.

“Fiske's methods were a little outdated,” said Murray Lemley, a photographer and graphic designer who put the book together. “He used a glass-plate camera at a time when a lot of people had switched to acetate or other sorts of forms. But it was valuable because it's really high-resolution.”

Lemley said that when he first saw Fiske’s images, he was struck by their clarity and power.

“Not only the method in which he photographed them, but the intensity and sort of the strength of the faces of the people in the photographs,” he said.

Rain-In-The-Face was a famous chief who fought with Sitting Bull at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876. “Most of the men that Fiske photographed were chiefs or sort of the elders of the tribe that had this sort of natural presence and projection of the strength that they had inside them,” Lemley said.

Iron Star wears a cape made of bobcat skin.

Joe No Heart as a native police officer.

Back then, soft-focus lenses had become very popular. They were used often in the famous work of Edward S. Curtis, who took photos of Native Americans at about the same time period as Fiske.

But Fiske’s style, Lemley said, is cleaner and more documentary than Curtis’. It allows the viewer to see more details of the people and what they wore. And Fiske had other advantages, too.

“You could tell by a lot of the photographs that he did have a rapport” with his subjects, Lemley said. “These were people that he had known all of his life when he lived there. And I think that comes through because there’s always this sort of steadiness of expression or the look on the faces of these people that he's photographed.”

Photographer Frank Bennett Fiske was a young man when he took over the photo studio at Fort Yates. He died in 1952.

“The Standing Rock Portraits,” a book released by Lannoo Publishers, is now available. Frank Bennett Fiske’s work is part of the collections at the State Historical Society of North Dakota.


Watch the video: The incredible history of Chinas terracotta warriors - Megan Campisi and Pen-Pen Chen (July 2022).


Comments:

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