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Elizabeth Wilkinson

Elizabeth Wilkinson


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Elizabeth Wilkinson was a member of the Communist Party. On the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War she helped establish the British Women's Committee Against War and Fascism and was appointed secretary of the Spanish Women's Committee for Help to Spain.

In 1937 Wilkinson was sent by the The Daily Worker to report on the war in the Basque country. After the Second World War Wilkinson and her husband ran a progressive school.

Yesterday at about 1.30 pm I arrived in Guernica, the ancient capital of the Basque country. It was a peaceful town, with no factories, no munition works and no troops stationed there. Peasant women and children were going quietly about the streets.

Then at four o'clock the rebels began a brutal bombardment which continued without stopping until seven in the evening.

More than fifty German planes rained bombs on the town and machine-gunned the streets incessantly. The surrounding villages were similarly bombarded. The rebel planes even machine-gunned the flocks in the fields.

At eleven o'clock at night the whole town was in flames, not a single house standing. The streets and the square were crammed with goods and chattels snatched from the inferno. The people are still searching for missing relatives, for wives, daughters, husbands, sweethearts and children.

During the first few minutes of the bombardment the Catholic priest blessed the people, Socialists and Communists included.

The roads out of Guernica are now thronged with refugees, driving their sheep and cattle and carrying their rescued goods with them. Eleven thousand more people are coming to Bilbao. Eleven thousand more to be fed.

Heavy bombing still continues, including bombs having set the pine woods at Solluse alight.

The militia, however, are still holding the crest, and the last line of fortifications outside Bilbao has been constructed.

Only two days before an appeal was made in the press for the work to be done, and 500 people volunteered immediately.

Particularly fine has been the response of the women, married women whose husbands are at the front, mothers whose children have been taken away to safety, refugees from San Sebastian.

Bilbao lies in a deep hollow, and the fortifications have been built on the edge of the hills dominating the roads.

Work went on from seven in the morning until seven at night. A young girl said to me, 'It is better up here than down below. Although there is so much bombing, we get down into the trenches. They waste their ammunition.'

On the way back I had twice to take refuge. I counted six bombers with eight chasers. They dropped many bombs.

The big asylum at Zamudio was ablaze. Women and children were hastening from the farms nearby. Aeroplanes came suddenly and caught numbers of them.

Hitler is celebrating Coronation Day with the biggest air-raid and bombardment on this city since the offensive began.

As I write this, at midday, in the centre of Bilbao, I can see a tremendous pall of black smoke darkening the bright sky.

There at La Campsa in the outskirts of Bilbao, a huge petrol dump is in flames. When I was out in this area I could feel the intense heat from the tremendous conflagration on the other side of the river, where the roads and the embankment were pock-marked by machine-gun bullets. And the dump is still flaming.

A little later a house in front of where I was standing was completely destroyed. The people who had lived there talked to me just a little, and one of the things they said was: 'I should like to put the London Non-Intervention Committee right in the middle of all this.'

I counted nine bombers and seven chasers come over. They bomb and machine-gun everything the pilots can set eyes on. They have even bombed a herd of cattle coming along one of the roads into Bilbao.

The people streaming in along those roads say they are strewn with dead and dying cows.

Already the Nazi pilots have dropped thirty big explosive bombs and hundreds of incendiary bombs on the city. They dropped them when you in England were laughing and shouting.

As I write the sirens, signalling a raid, are sounding again. I cannot tell what will happen.


Wilkinsons Genealogy

This page is intended to be your first step in tracing Wilkinson genealogy. The resources available include a database of user-submitted family trees, Wilkinson-related documents, and pointers to Wilkinson-related on-line resources. Please contact the website if you have anything to share with the Wilkinson community.

Wilkinson Genealogy Database In the olden days before Ancestry.com. users submitted links to their pages or files of their Wilkinson-related genealogy.

Wilkinson Documents There is a section on this page for books and documents relating to Wilkinson genealogy. If you have a related book or document for sale, available for lookups, or ready for submission to the site, please feel free to contact the site and a reference will be added.

Wilkinson Family History In the family history section is information on the general history of the Wilkinson family, gathered from a variety of sources.

Wilkinson Online Resources There are also links to genealogy pages on the web that contain references to Wilkinsons. I try to keep these links up to date, but it is easy to overlook a few new or obsolete links. Please let me know of any omissions or errors.

The Wilkinson Genealogical Database

The Wilkinson genealogical database is comprised of data collected and combined with the data sent to the site by other researchers. Note that some names may be duplicated if more than one researcher has submitted the same information. For information on a specific person, please send mail to the researcher listed (if there is one for the person in whom you are interested).

Wilkinson Genealogical Documents


    The family history, descendants, and biography of General James Wilkinson of the American Revolutionary War. Click on the title for a picture and more complete description.
  • Memoirs of the Wilkinson Family
    Published in 1869 by Rev. Israel Wilkinson, this document has been scanned in and is available on-line (click the title). Thanks to David Blackwell for originally providing the book to the world and Bonnie Munce for transcribing and posting the text.
    A letter written by Hal Peterson to his young cousins detailing their Wilkinson heritage. Includes descriptions of the family origins, the area they inhabited in England, as well as anecdotes about specific family members.
  • Commemorative Biographical Record - Samuel Wilkinson
    A short biography of Samuel Wilkinson of Kerhonkson, copied from "Commemorative Biographical Record", submitted by J Schrade ([email protected]). Includes Samuel's family history, including his family from Yorkshire, England.
  • Bible Records Of The Garner & Wilkinson Families Of St. Mary's County, Maryland
    Submitted by John S. Wilkinson from a contribution by Mrs. Helen Hart Burns & Willis Clayton Tull, Jr. The entire text is available by clicking on the title.
  • Genealogy of Wilkinson and Kindred families
    Submitted by Thomas Thompson ([email protected]), who added the note:
    "M.M. Wilkinson, of Shelby, MS, published the 'Genealogy of Wilkinson and Kindred families', in 1949. This 546 p. report discusses in detail the Wilkinsons of Amite and Wilkinson Counties, Mississippi. My copy was given to me by an aunt (now deceased)in Starkville, Ms, around 1980. Feel free to send inquiries to me about your lineage possibly being listed in this book. My great grandmother was Sarah Wilkinson Thompson, of Gloster and Liberty MS."
    The content of the diary of William Augustus Wilkinson of Wilkinson County, Mississippi, USA has been donated to this site. It has been converted to html, and you are invited to browse the converted text. Gus started every entry with the weather, even the days when people were born, married, or died. An interesting look into the life of an American farmer in the 1800s.
  • Biographical and Historical Reminiscences of John W. Wilkinson
    Submitted by Kelli Sayre ([email protected]), who writes:
    "My 4th great-grandfather, John W. Wilkinson (05-27-1793 to 10-15-1867) wrote Biographical and Historical Reminiscences. He talks about his ancestors as well as his life, including marriage(s) and children. I would be willing to do look-ups (if I didn't get overwhelmed). It is approximately 150 pgs. single typed."
  • The Wilkinsons of England and America (1650-1997)
    is being published as 50 pages of a hard cover volume including Allison Family History. It covers the descendants of Thomas WILKINSON and Agnes RAW who migrated in 1835 from Yorkshire to Pennsylvania and then Illinois. The indexed section (750+ names) documents their descent from Rowland Wilkinson and Agnes HANDLAY of Sedbergh, Cumbria, England, and includes photographs of Crosedale Beck and of Howgill, Wilkinson residences dating back to 1650.
    Contact Pat Hemphill at [email protected] for details.
  • The Drum Family Record and Related Wilkinson Family in the United States of America
    By the Drum-Wilkinson Clan, Arthur W. Drum, Sherrill's Ford, North Carolina, May 1961. A copy of the Wilkinson-related information was made by Mr. Robert L. Richardson of Austin, TX, during his last visit to the Catawba County Library in Newton, NC. (This is the home of James Wilkinson of Dinwiddie County, VA - the Rev War private not the officer.) Mr. Richardson is willing to do lookups and can be contacted via email at [email protected]
  • Our Wilkinson and Related Families
    By Clarine Smith Tucker. Out of print, but available in some libraries.
  • Our Wilkerson and Wilkinson Families
    By Thomas B. Wilkinson

There are a variety of origins for the surname Wilkinson. The most obvious is "son of Wilkin", where Wilkin comes either from William or "son of Will". (In other words, Wilkinson means grandson of Will.) However, there are a variety of other sources for the name, including McQuilkin, a popular origin from Scotland.

Many years ago, the administrator of this website travelled to England, where the Wilkinson name is much more common. While there, he stopped into one of the genealogy shops that have sprung up around the country and had a marvelous conversation with the proprietor, who managed to convince him to purchase several products related to Wilkinsons genealogy. One was a coat of arms (currently on the Coat of Arms page at this site), and the other was a "scroll" containing research on the family name. The proprietor went to great lengths to assert that the information that it contained was accurate. However, much of the information seems contradictory to other sources. Some of the sources that the company claims to use include: the Domesday Book, the Ragman Rolls, the Wace poem, the Honour Roll of the Battel Abbey, the Curia Regis, Pipe Rolls, the Falaise Roll, tax records, baptismals, family genealogies, and local parish and church records.

Some of the information obtained is included below in green. I encourage you to contact the company if you want to know more.

NEVER ASSUME THAT ANYTHING THAT YOU READ ON THE INTERNET IS CORRECT UNLESS YOU HAVE INDEPENDENTLY VERIFIED IT OR IT IS CONSISTENT WITH WHAT YOU ALREADY KNOW TO BE TRUE.

You have been warned. This website makes no claims to the veracity of the following information.

Apparently, the Wilkinson surname is Norman in origin. The first record of the surname was found in Durham, where the clan was seated from ancient times. They were descended from Robert de Wintona, of Glamorgan, one of the 12 knights who came into Glamorgan with Robert Fitzhamon, a Norman noble, in 1066. Fitzhamon was Sheriff of Kent and founder of Tewkesbury.

The name Wilkinson was first assumed in about 1250. Wilkinsons held estates in Durham in Hulam, Coxhoe, Eddercres, Sheriton, The Granges, Hurworth Bryan, White Hurworth, Langdale, Stanley, Holmeside, Tursdale, Whitton, Brafferton, Woodham Burn, Rushyford, Stoballee, and in locations in Northumberland. They also held estates in Scarborough, York, Pontefract, Kirkbrigg, and Winterburn Hall in Yorkshire. Of note among the family at this time was Lancelot Wilkinson of Kyo in Durham.

Of those going to North America, included were: William Wilkinson settled in Virginia in 1606 (14 years before the Mayflower) Cornelius Wilkinson was married in St. John's, Newfoudland in 1815 Anthony and Anne Wilkinson settled in Virginia in 1651 John Wilkinson settled in Salem, Mass. in 1630 Thomas Wilkinson with his wife and child settled in Virginia in Nova Scotia in 1774.

Notables on the social scene during this time: Rev. Canon Alan Wilkinson, Theologian Professor Alexander Wilkinson, Law Professor Andrew Wilkinson, Surgeon Sir Denys Wilkinson, Physics Sir David Wilkinson Rt. Rev. Charles Wilkinson, Bishop of Niagra Sir Harold Wilkinson, Shell Oil Lancelot Wilkinson, Classics Sir Peter Wilkinson, Diplomat Sir Martin Wilkinson, Chairman of the London Stock Exchange.

Wilkinsons have prospered all over the United States and around the world. In 1990, the surname Wilkinson was the 631st most popular surname in the United States according to the US Census name frequency server. According to Hamrick Software, there are about 1 Wilkinson per 1000 people in most US states, as shown in the picture below (from 1997).

According to the World Names profiler, which uses publicly available telephone directories or national electoral registers, sourced for the period 2000-2005, the Wilkinson name is most popular in the UK with nearly 13,000 Wilkinsons per million (Wpm). Australia is second with just over 850 Wpm. New Zealand comes in third at 816 Wpm. The U.S. is fourth at 232 Wpm. Wilkinsons are most prevalent in the northern region of the UK, where there are a whopping 3402 Wpm.

The World Names profiler also reports that the most popular first names for Wilkinsons worldwide are (in order) Timothy, Wayne, Eric, Caroline, Amanda, Dennis, Harold, Darren, Claire, and Anne.


Associate Professor

American Culture and DifferenceEnglish

PhD, Department of English University of North Carolina at Greensboro, August 2008 Dissertation: “Story as a Weapon in Colonized America: Native American Women’s Transrhetorical Fight for Land Rights”

Graduate Certificate, Women’s and Gender Studies Program University of North Carolina at Greensboro, December 2008

MA, Department of English Virginia Polytechnic and State University, 2002

MEd, Curriculum and Instruction, Department of Education The Pennsylvania State University at University Park, 1993

BA, Department of English and University Scholars Program The Pennsylvania State University at University Park, 1989 Schreyer Honors College

  • Expertise
  • Women and Sports, Native American Literature and the Environment, Native Women's Literatures Ecofeminism
  • Research Interests
  • Women, Sport, and Suffrage Women, Sport, and the Body Women and Environmental Activism

I'm a lifelong athlete and lover of words feminism came a bit later, but is all the more cherished for it. At Penn State, I juggled DI sports (springboard diving) with classes in the Honors College. I married those two loves in my first job as a sports reporter, before heading back first to Penn State and then to Virginia Tech for Master's degrees: Education followed by English. At Tech, I was lucky to be mentored by two Cherokee professors, who guided my research on Native American literatures. In my PhD, an all-female team of professors fostered my interest in Native women's rhetoric and led me to add a certification in Women and Gender Studies to my scholarship.

At UST, my love for sports writing has reemerged, along with my love for camaraderie and competition. I teach sports literature as a core and as an honors course I teach Native literatures at the undergraduate and graduate level and I teach women's literatures and women, gender & sexuality studies for both the English and the WGSS departments. I also compete, alongside other UST women, in the YWCA triathlon every August. My current area of research is on women and sports, and I am writing a book that combines elements of memoir with feminist theory and sports history.

Dr. Wilkinson’s teaching and research brings together seemingly divergent interests in indigenous literature, feminism and sports. A former college athlete herself, Dr. Wilkinson is writing an article about 19th and 20th century female athletes and women’s suffrage, and a book on sports and feminism.


Elizabeth Wilkinson and Henry S. Millard

Elizabeth Wilkinson was born on July 28, 1833, to William and Harriet Wilkinson. She and her brother William were likely twins, and they had eight younger siblings. One of her most well-known siblings, Edward Wilkinson, was twelve years younger and became one of North Adams’s mayors. Elizabeth’s husband Henry S. Millard was born May 9th, 1834, in Bennington, Vermont. After the Millard family moved to North Adams, Henry’s father, George, purchased an old shoe manufacturing building. He sold off the shoes relatively cheaply and used the old building’s space to open a dry goods store. Millard’s store was known for having the cheapest prices because he specialized in dry goods, which meant he could buy them in bulk. George was also known for being one of the spearheads of the Hoosac tunnel project. Henry started off working with his father at the dry goods store, and he later bought George’s shares when the old man retired. It’s unknown when exactly Henry and Elizabeth got married. However, they had their first child together in 1855, a daughter whom they named Mary. They had a second daughter in 1862 named Helen.

Henry’s business partner was Jerome B. Jackson. The two built a brick factory together on Union Street and were partners until 1867 when William H. Whitman bought out Jackson’s shares. Later in 1874, N. L. Millard bought out Henry’s shares.

During this time Henry was also a member of the Lafayette Lodge. The Lodge was first established in 1847 and in 1848 became an official chartered Masonry Lodge. In 1873 Henry became the Master of the Lafayette Lodge but then left it in 1874 to become a charter member of The Composite Chapter Royal Arch Masons. The second masonic lodge was created due to the increase in population in North Adams and the surrounding area.

Unfortunately, shortly after Henry joined the new lodge, Elizabeth passed away. She died on June 11, 1878, having just celebrated her forty-fifth birthday. Henry mourned but remarried within two years to Harriet Soper of New Britain, Connecticut. Henry’s new wife was 21 years his junior, and was the same age as his oldest daughter Mary. Henry himself died August 16th 1909 at the age of seventy-five. At the time he was still living in North Adams, having returned after living in various other locations including New Britain Connecticut. He outlived his new wife Harriet by two years. Henry was buried in the Hillside cemetery with Elizabeth.


Wilkinson Ancestry Report Page

. +Clement Biddle PENROSE II b: in St. Louis, MO d: Bef. 1863 in Belize, Mississippi River m: June 03, 1830 in Point Celeste Plantation, Plaquemines, LA Father: Clement Biddle Penrose Mother: Ann Howard Bingham

. 6 Clement Biddle PENROSE III d: Bef. 1863

. 6 Joseph Biddle Wilkinson PENROSE d: in Gettysburg

. +Camille BRIGHT b: in New Orleans, LA

. +Laura MAGINNI b: in New Orleans, LA

. 7 Camille PENROSE d: in childhood

. 6 Anna Howard PENROSE d: in New Orleans, LA

. 5 Robert Andrews WILKINSON b: October 16, 1809 in Bellefield Plantation, Adams Co., MS d: August 30, 1862 in 2nd Battle of Manasses

. +Mary Farrar STARK b: April 12, 1809 in Ft. Adams, MS d: January 15, 1901 in New Orleans, LA m: July 11, 1837 in Roseland, near Woodville, MS Father: Horatio Stark I Mother: Hannah Ellis

. 6 John Washington WILKINSON

. 6 Elizabeth Andrews WILKINSON b: Abt. 1838 d: in childhood

. 6 Eliza Rosanna WILKINSON b: Abt. 1839 d: Aft. 1905

. +Simeon TOBY b: in New Orleans, LA d: May 04, 1904 m: June 06, 1870 in Orleans Parish, LA

. 6 Robert Andrews WILKINSON II b: Abt. 1841 in LA d: February 14, 1897 in buried in St. Peter's Plantation churchyard

. +Lucy ASHBY b: Abt. 1843 in VA d: in Jennings, LA Father: Marshall Ashby Mother: Lucinda Cocke

. 7 Robert Andrews WILKINSON III b: 1868

. 7 John Washington WILKINSON b: 1873

. 7 Carroll Allen WILKINSON b: 1874

. +Winnifred May HILL b: 1875 in AR

. 8 Carroll WILKINSON b: October 07, 1909

. 8 Laurel Turner WILKINSON b: April 23, 1908 d: October 19, 1911

. 7 Lucy Ashby WILKINSON b: August 19, 1876 in Myrtle Grove Plantation, LA d: August 31, 1940 in Jennings, LA

. +Jules REAUD, Sr. b: October 23, 1864 in Cahoba, AL d: April 02, 1936 in Jennings, LA m: August 05, 1896 in Myrtle Grove (Alliance) Plantation Father: Victor Edgar Reaud Mother: Louise Elmina Marin

. 8 Jules REAUD, Jr. b: May 16, 1896 in New Orleans, LA d: August 27, 1951 in Jennings, LA

. +Ruby MARSHALL b: March 28, 1904 d: October 27, 1962 in Jennings, LA

. 8 Victor Edgar REAUD b: December 21, 1899 in Estherwood, LA d: June 1971

. +Eula Mae TALBOT/THEBAULT b: December 28, 1901 d: January 07, 1989

. 8 Sidney Lawrence REAUD b: 1904 d: 1952

. +Irene Babe MEYER b: November 21, 1911 d: January 16, 1985

. *2nd Wife of Sidney Lawrence Reaud:

. 8 Helen Elmina REAUD b: January 14, 1915 in Jennings, LA d: February 26, 1996 in Jennings, LA

. +Louis James SEGAR b: May 07, 1916 in New Orleans, LA d: August 02, 1986 in New Orleans, LA m: 1936 in New Orleans, LA Father: James Lawrence Segar Mother: Anna McCormack

. *2nd Husband of Helen Elmina Reaud:

. +Elmer Edward BUFFINGTON b: November 06, 1921 in Belleville, IL d: March 06, 1985 in Jennings, La m: November 02, 1947 Father: Buffington

. 7 Horatio Marshall WILKINSON b: 1869

. 7 Mary WILKINSON b: Abt. 1884

. +William Joseph ARNOLD b: Abt. 1880 in IL

. 8 Unnamed ARNOLD b: August 19, 1909

. 6 James WILKINSON b: Abt. 1842 d: in childhood

. 6 Catherine WILKINSON b: Abt. 1843

. +Carroll Woolsey ALLEN b: in New Orleans, LA

. 7 Catherine Wilkinson ALLEN

. 7 Carroll Woolsey ALLEN II

. 6 Horatio Stark WILKINSON b: 1844

. +Mary Elizabeth ASHBY d: January 29, 1906 in Jennings, LA Father: Marshall Ashby Mother: Lucinda Cocke

. 7 Horatio Stark WILKINSON II b: 1877

. *2nd Wife of Horatio Stark Wilkinson:

. +Florence PERKINS b: in North Carolina

. 6 Annabella Stark WILKINSON b: Abt. 1845

. 6 Mary Farrar WILKINSON b: Abt. 1846

. 5 Mary Elizabeth WILKINSON b: December 12, 1812 in Bellefield Plantation, Adams Co., MS d: in Point Celeste Plantation, Plaquemines, LA

. +Theodore Osborne STARK b: 1816 d: 1900 in MS m: March 01, 1843 in Wilkinson Co, MS Father: Horatio Stark I Mother: Elizabeth Osborne

. 5 Joseph Biddle WILKINSON II b: April 21, 1817 in Jefferson County, MS d: July 11, 1902 in New Orleans, LA

. +Josephine Osborne STARK b: 1821 in Woodville, Wilkinson Co., MS d: January 28, 1908 in New Orleans, LA m: May 16, 1844 in Plaquemine Parish, LA Father: Horatio Stark I Mother: Elizabeth Osborne

. 6 Andrews WILKINSON b: in Plaquemine Parish

. 6 Elizabeth WILKINSON d: in at 5

. 6 Joseph Biddle WILKINSON III b: Abt. 1845

. +Lydia DUVALL b: in Mobile, AL

. 7 Joseph Biddle WILKINSON IV

. 6 Robert Andrews WILKINSON b: Abt. 1846

. +Elizabeth Maury HARDING b: in Port Gibson

. 6 Theodore Stark WILKINSON b: Abt. 1847

. +Pauline SPYKER b: in New Orleans, LA

. 6 Clement Penrose WILKINSON b: Abt. 1848

. +Lucy WHITE Father: Maunsell White

. 7 Clement Penrose WILKINSON II d: in very young

. 7 Maunsell White WILKINSON

. 6 Horace WILKINSON b: Abt. 1849

. +TUCKER b: in Baton Rouge, LA

. 6 James WILKINSON b: Abt. 1850

. *2nd Wife of James Wilkinson:

. 6 Ernest WILKINSON b: Abt. 1851 d: in at fifteen

. +Elma BOSTICK b: in South Carolina

. 7 Theodore Stark WILKINSON

. 6 Herbert WILKINSON b: Abt. 1852 d: in early boyhood

. 6 Josephine Victoria WILKINSON b: Abt. 1853 d: in Birmingham, AL

. +Thomas WORTHINGTON b: in Alabama

. 7 Josephine WORTHINGTON d: in infancy

. 5 Catherine WILKINSON b: 1820 in Jefferson County, MS d: 1833

. 5 Marcella WILKINSON b: March 29, 1822 in Point Celeste Plantation, Plaquemines, LA d: March 17, 1909 in San Antonio, TX

. 5 Rebecca WILKINSON b: March 28, 1825 in Point Celeste Plantation, Plaquemines, LA

. 5 Virginia WILKINSON b: May 19, 1827 in Point Celeste Plantation, Plaquemines, LA d: June 02, 1888 in New Orleans, LA

. +William Cummin WILDE Father: Richard Herr Wilde

. 6 Catherine Wilkinson WILDE

. 6 Caroline WILDE d: in Austin, TX

. 5 Julia WILKINSON b: December 25, 1829 in Point Celeste Plantation, Plaquemines, LA d: in San Antonio, TX

. *2nd Husband of Julia Wilkinson:

. +FREDERICK b: in Ireland m: in Point Celeste Plantation, Plaquemines, LA

. 6 Leticia FREDERICK d: April 09, 1909 in San Antonio, TX

. 4 Daughter WILKINSON d: in young

. *2nd Wife of James Wilkinson:

. +Celestine TRUDEAU m: March 05, 1810 in New Orleans, LA Father: Charles Laveau Trudeau

. 4 Marie Isabel WILKINSON b: January 23, 1816 d: Bet. 1816 - 1820

. 4 Elizabeth Stephanie WILKINSON b: January 23, 1816

. 5 Charles Arthur BIGOT b: May 23, 1834

. 5 Theodore Felix BIGOT b: September 21, 1836

Wilkinson History

This is a history of just my line of the Wilkinson family. For more complete info go the the Wilkinson Website. According to my Grandmother, her family owned the Myrtle Grove Plantation and then lost it, but I can't find a record of it except one reference - during the huge St. Sophie flood of 1884 a TS Wilkinson was given supplies for Myrtle Grove. According to Old Louisiana Plantation Homes & Family Trees (V2) the Wilkinsons owned the Live Oak Plantation . (An interesting note - the Reaud's owned the plantation next to Live Oaks.) RA (Robert Andrews) Wilkinson is listed as the overseer of the LaBlanche (LaBranche?) plantation on the coast 11 miles from the courthouse on the 1880 census. Joseph Wilkinson was married to Elizabeth Skinner and immigrated from England in 1729 and was given a land grant in Calvert County, MD and owned a plantation on the south side of Hunters Creek called Stoakley according to the History of Calvert County p104. General James Wilkinson founded Frankfurt, KY and owned Live Oak Plantation. Joseph Jr. died when James was 7.

According to my Grandmother a little known fact of Wilkinson history is that General James Wilkinson was not only largely responsible for the Louisiana Purchase but that he secretly tried to sell it back for a profit. Now I can find no record of that anywhere else but I thought it was quite interesting.

The source for the following material was an old Wilkinson Family History that my grandmother got from some cousins. We can't seem to find a copy of it anywhere but this was taken off of a Family History I did while in school that was found in a box my mother kept of some of my baby and school stuff. If anyone can find a copy of this history (or knows what I'm talking about) please e-mail me. Thank you.

Joseph Wilkinson came to this country from England in 1729 and was give a land grant in Calvert County according to "Plantation Homes and Family Trees" and settled in Maryland. He married Miss Skinner and they had two children. He was buried in St. Paul's churchyard (England?).

Joseph Wilkinson II married Miss Heigte and had two sons and a daughter - Joseph, James and Elizabeth.

James Wilkinson was born in 1757. His father died when he was seven and his mother sent him to school in Baltimore. He entered medical school while a little over seventeen years of age and graduated in medicine at the age of 19. He enlisted in the military and fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill. He married Ann Biddle of Philadelphia and had one daughter and three sons. He entered the army in 1776 under Col. Thompson. He was appointed Captain in March of 1776, Lt. Colonel in January by General Washington. In November of 1777 he received the Brevet of Brigadier, General by General Washington. James was the U.S. General who received the "Province of Louisiana" from France. He established the Barracks at Bellefontaine near St. Louis. When he retired he became a planter at his plantation - Live Oak, located 25 miles below New Orleans. He died in 1825 and was buried in a Baptist cemetary in Mexico.

Joseph Biddle Wilkinson, the second born of James and Ann married Catherine Andrews of Scottish descendant. They came to Louisiana in 1808 and had three sons and six daughters. They owned a plantation in Plaquemines Parish named "Pointe Celeste". He sold his plantation and moved to New Orleans where he died November 08, 1865 at the age of 80. During the civil war he was put in prison on an alleged charge of burying fire-arms, but was liberated by General Weitzel, an old friend.

Robert Wilkinson was born at Bellefield Plantation in Mississippi. He married Mrs. Mary Gildart (nee Stark) and they had nine children. When the confederate war broke out, he joined the Army and went out as Captain of a company from the parish, serving under Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson. He was killed as a Lt. Colonel at the second battle of Manasses. Mary, his wife, was put in prison in New Orleans for refusing to take the oath of allegiance to the United States. She finally did so. He was killed at the Battle of Manasses in 1862.

Robert Andrews Wilkinson married Lucy Ashby of Virginia and had five sons and six daughters. Robert served with his father in the Army at age 16 in Virginia and then Louisiana. He was wounded but not seriously. He later died on February 14, 1897 and was buried at St. Peter's Plantation in the churchyard. His wife Lucy died in Jennings, LA and was buried there (this the family did not realize - we are trying to locate her gravesite now).

Lucy Ashby Wilkinson, daughter of Robert and Lucy Ashby married Jules Reaud, Sr. at the Alliance Plantation. They had three sons and one daughter. She died in 1939 in Jennings. Jules Reaud, Sr. died in 1936.


Elizabeth Wilkinson - History

Check out Jennifer's latest SessionGirls interview, with Emma Switch!
For discussion, visit this topic.

In another thread, someone (verscont) posted a link to an article about Jane Couch - a British Boxer - who had to win a court case to be licensed to Box professionally as a female living in Britain.

This was in 1998. Even in the years following - and in countries that had legalised/permitted women to Box professionally years prior - many promoters refused to promote women because they “didn’t like it”. Dana White for example, UFC president, was for many years saying women would “never” compete in the UFC. Frank Warren, who now promotes Nicola Adams, is also on record as saying “never in a million years will I get involved in it.” News outlets refused to cover it.

I looked into the history of women’s Boxing and unbelievably women were Boxing in Britain 300 years ago. Not Boxing as we know it today, but a more brutal, barbaric form of bare-fisted fighting that allowed gouging, kicking and to some degree grappling. These fight were not held in unlicensed, frowned upon-if-anyone-found-out backstreets, but in packed amphitheatres, championed by top promoters of the time and bouts promoted and advertised by major news outlets. We know because these newspaper articles are archived. It’s amazing how, as a society, we sometimes go backwards and talk about “breakthroughs” as if they have never happened before.

My attention was drawn to Elizabeth Wilkinson Stokes. Here are some links to articles and snippets of information I found.

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Elizabeth Wilkinson (alternatively referred to as Elizabeth Stokes) was an English bare-knuckle boxing champion from Clerkenwell, considered by many to be the first female boxer.

Billing herself as the European Championess, she fought both men and women. In those days, the rules of pugilism allowed kicking, gouging and other methods of attack not part of today's arsenal.

In June 1722 Wilkinson challenged Hannah Hyfield of Newgate Market to what may have been the first female prizefight in London. A London journal printed Wilkinson’s challenge

I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkewell, having had some Words with Hannah Hyfield, and requiring Satisfaction, do invite her to meet me on the Stage, and Box me for Three Guineas, each Woman holding Half a Crown in each Hand, and the first Woman that drop her Money to Use the Battle.

… to which Hyfield responded

I Hannah Hyfield of New gate Market, hearing the Resoluteness of Elizabeth Wilkinson, will not fail, God-willing, to give her more Blows than Words, desiring home Blows, and from her no Favour.

Following her victory over Hannah Hyfield, Elizabeth became a fixture in James Figg’s boxing venues, where she continued to fight and dominate the ring. It appears that she remained undefeated in her pugilistic career.

Over the course of her career, Elizabeth primarily fought in boxing matches, although her skills with a short sword and dagger were well-known.
Sometime between 1722 and 1726, Elizabeth Wilkinson became known as Elizabeth Stokes, the wife of fellow pugilistic, James Stokes. Elizabeth and James were often challenged as a pair with Elizabeth fighting the wife and James the husband.

Wilkinson was also something of a trash-talker and keen self promoter. In 1728, Elizabeth responded to her most demanding challenge yet from Ann Field, an ass-driver from Stoke Newington. Historians often cite this challenge, not only because of Ann’s humorous job description, but because Elizabeth is so assured in her response. The bout itself, held on October 7, 1728, was easily overshadowed by the clever and funny correspondence in the media:

I, Ann Field, of Stoke Newington, ass driver, well known for my abilities in boxing in my own defence wherever it happened in my way, having been affronted by Mrs. Stokes, styled the European Championess, do fairly invite her to a trial of her best skill in Boxing for 10 pounds, fair rise and fall and question not but to give her such proofs of my judgment that shall oblige her to acknowledge me Championess of the Stage, to the entire satisfaction of all my friends.

Field’s courageous challenge was met with particularly cutting remarks from Stokes:


Girlboxing

As a Labor Day treat, I thought it might be fun to share historical accounts and commentary about Elizabeth Wilkinson Stokes, generally accepted as the first recorded female boxing champion who took her fists and whatever weapons were handy into the streets of London in the early part of the 18th Century! And yes, that’s 18th Century!

Beginning in the early 1700’s organized “street”-fighting became an early popular form of entertainment in England, and while it had been around even earlier, “bare-knuckle fighting” as it was known then became popularized by James Figg who elevated the sport from one of a working-class free-for-all to a form closer to today’s boxing at his School of Arms and Self Defense.

To quote an article entitled Prize Fighters: Elizabeth Wilkinson-Stokes: The “London Journal” for June 23, 1722, refers to a battle between “two of the feminine gender” who “maintained the battle with great valour for a long time, to the no small satisfaction of the spectators.” After this description the advertisement appeared: “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her adversary to meet her on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter would hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle. Elizabeth Wilkinson won on that day. Shortly after this she beat another lady pugilist from Billingsgate – Martha Jones. The only details of this contest are that it lasted 22 minutes.”

Christopher James Shelton’s article about Elizabeth Wilkinson Stokes entitled 1720’s English MMA Fighter cites numerous historical accounts of her remarkable achievements fighting both men and women. Shelton’s article is informative and details her exploits and the historical context for the 18th Century’s version of pugilism.

Shelton was also recently interviewed on the Ringside Boxing Show about Elizabeth Wilkinson Stokes. To give a listen, the link is here: First Female Fighter, Circa 1720.

An article penned by Lucy, on the Georgian London website provides other fascinating quotes from newspapers and other sources to include this account from 1728 in the Daily Post:

At Mr Stokes’s Amphitheatre in Islington Road, this present Monday, being the 7th of October, will be a complete Boxing Match, by the two following Championesses: Whereas I, Ann Field, of Stoke Newington, ass driver, well-known for my abilities in my own defence, whenever it happened in my way, having been affronted by Mrs Stokes, styled the European Championess, do fairly invite her to a trial of her best skill in Boxing, for 10 pounds fair rise and fall…I, Elizabeth Stokes, of the City of London, have not fought this way since I fought the famous Boxing Woman of Billingsgate 29 minutes and gained a complete victory….but as the famous ass-woman of Stowe Newington dares me to fight her for the 10 pounds, I do assure her I shall not tail meeting her for the said sum, and doubt not that the blows I shall present her with will be more difficult to digest than any she ever gave her asses.


Girlboxing

As a Labor Day treat, I thought it might be fun to share historical accounts and commentary about Elizabeth Wilkinson Stokes, generally accepted as the first recorded female boxing champion who took her fists and whatever weapons were handy into the streets of London in the early part of the 18th Century! And yes, that’s 18th Century!

Beginning in the early 1700’s organized “street”-fighting became an early popular form of entertainment in England, and while it had been around even earlier, “bare-knuckle fighting” as it was known then became popularized by James Figg who elevated the sport from one of a working-class free-for-all to a form closer to today’s boxing at his School of Arms and Self Defense.

To quote an article entitled Prize Fighters: Elizabeth Wilkinson-Stokes: The “London Journal” for June 23, 1722, refers to a battle between “two of the feminine gender” who “maintained the battle with great valour for a long time, to the no small satisfaction of the spectators.” After this description the advertisement appeared: “I, Elizabeth Wilkinson of Clerkenwell, who had earlier had some words with Hannah Hyfield, ‘challenged and invited’ her adversary to meet her on the stage for three guineas. Each fighter would hold half-a-crown in each hand and the first to drop the money would lose the battle. Elizabeth Wilkinson won on that day. Shortly after this she beat another lady pugilist from Billingsgate – Martha Jones. The only details of this contest are that it lasted 22 minutes.”

Christopher James Shelton’s article about Elizabeth Wilkinson Stokes entitled 1720’s English MMA Fighter cites numerous historical accounts of her remarkable achievements fighting both men and women. Shelton’s article is informative and details her exploits and the historical context for the 18th Century’s version of pugilism.

Shelton was also recently interviewed on the Ringside Boxing Show about Elizabeth Wilkinson Stokes. To give a listen, the link is here: First Female Fighter, Circa 1720.

An article penned by Lucy, on the Georgian London website provides other fascinating quotes from newspapers and other sources to include this account from 1728 in the Daily Post:

At Mr Stokes’s Amphitheatre in Islington Road, this present Monday, being the 7th of October, will be a complete Boxing Match, by the two following Championesses: Whereas I, Ann Field, of Stoke Newington, ass driver, well-known for my abilities in my own defence, whenever it happened in my way, having been affronted by Mrs Stokes, styled the European Championess, do fairly invite her to a trial of her best skill in Boxing, for 10 pounds fair rise and fall…I, Elizabeth Stokes, of the City of London, have not fought this way since I fought the famous Boxing Woman of Billingsgate 29 minutes and gained a complete victory….but as the famous ass-woman of Stowe Newington dares me to fight her for the 10 pounds, I do assure her I shall not tail meeting her for the said sum, and doubt not that the blows I shall present her with will be more difficult to digest than any she ever gave her asses.


Boxing career

In June 1722 Wilkinson challenged Hannah Hyfield of Newgate Market to what may have been the first female prizefight in London. [3] Her advertisement in a London newspaper declared ”I, Elizabeth Wilkinson, of Clerkenwell, having had some words with Hannah Hyfield, and requiring Satisfaction, do invite her to meet me on the Stage and Box me". They went on to specify that each woman would grasp half a crown in each hand, a rule that prevented the gouging and scratching common in eighteenth-century boxing. [1] [2]

She then went on that year to fight a fish-woman named Martha Jones, who she reportedly beat after twenty-two minutes. [3] [4]

Wilkinson became a fixture in the boxing venues of James Figg. Though Figg was the most prominent promoter and male boxer of the early eighteenth century, Elizabeth was the more popular and famous boxer at the time. [2]

In October 1726 a fight was announced between Wilkinson and the Irish Mary Welch, to take place at James Stokes' amphitheatre. A note at the bottom of the advert states "They fight in cloth Jackets, short Petticoats, coming just below the Knee, Holland Drawers, white Stockings, and pumps". [2] At the time it was more common for women, sometimes prostitutes, to fight topless. By competing fully clothed Wilkinson and her opponents defined themselves as serious athletes. [1] In the newspaper featuring the advert, Welch describes Elizabeth as "the famous Championess of England". In her response Elizabeth claims to be undefeated, "having never engaged with any of my own Sex but I always came off with Victory and Applause". [2]

Wilkinson and her husband James Stokes were often challenged as a pair, with her fighting the woman and him the man. The first of these were from her former opponent Mary Welch and her trainer Robert Baker to challenge "Mr. Stokes and his bold Amazonian Virago" in July 1727. Thomas and Sarah Barret gave a similar challenge in December 1728, calling Wilkinson 'this European Championess". In their response James Stokes notes that Elizabeth was "thought not to fight in Publick anymore" but "my spouse not doubting but to do the fame and hopes to give a general Satisfaction to all Spectators". [2]

In addition to being a boxing champion, Wilkinson acted as an instructor. [2]

Wilkinson was a keen self-promoter, and famous for her entertaining trash-talk. [1] In a published acceptance of a challenge from Ann Field, an ass-driver from Stoke Newington, she told readers that "the blows which I shall present her with will be more difficult for her to digest than any she ever gave her asses". [2]


Isabel Wilkerson’s ‘Caste’ Is an ‘Instant American Classic’ About Our Abiding Sin

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A critic shouldn’t often deal in superlatives. He or she is here to explicate, to expand context and to make fine distinctions. But sometimes a reviewer will shout as if into a mountaintop megaphone. I recently came upon William Kennedy’s review of “One Hundred Years of Solitude,” which he called “the first piece of literature since the Book of Genesis that should be required reading for the entire human race.” Kennedy wasn’t far off.

I had these thoughts while reading Isabel Wilkerson’s new book, “Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents.” It’s an extraordinary document, one that strikes me as an instant American classic and almost certainly the keynote nonfiction book of the American century thus far. It made the back of my neck prickle from its first pages, and that feeling never went away.

I told more than one person, as I moved through my days this past week, that I was reading one of the most powerful nonfiction books I’d ever encountered.

Wilkerson’s book is about how brutal misperceptions about race have disfigured the American experiment. This is a topic that major historians and novelists have examined from many angles, with care, anger, deep feeling and sometimes simmering wit.

Wilkerson’s book is a work of synthesis. She borrows from all that has come before, and her book stands on many shoulders. “Caste” lands so firmly because the historian, the sociologist and the reporter are not at war with the essayist and the critic inside her. This book has the reverberating and patriotic slap of the best American prose writing.

[ This book is one of our most anticipated titles of August. See the full list. ]

This is a complicated book that does a simple thing. Wilkerson, who won a Pulitzer Prize for national reporting while at The New York Times and whose previous book, “The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America’s Great Migration,” won the National Book Critics Circle Award, avoids words like “white” and “race” and “racism” in favor of terms like “dominant caste,” “favored caste,” “upper caste” and “lower caste.”

Some will quibble with her conflation of race and caste. (Social class is a separate matter, which Wilkerson addresses only rarely.) She does not argue that the words are synonyms. She argues that they “can and do coexist in the same culture and serve to reinforce each other. Race, in the United States, is the visible agent of the unseen force of caste. Caste is the bones, race the skin.” The reader does not have to follow her all the way on this point to find her book a fascinating thought experiment. She persuasively pushes the two notions together while addressing the internal wounds that, in America, have failed to clot.

A caste system, she writes, is “an artificial construction, a fixed and embedded ranking of human value that sets the presumed supremacy of one group against the presumed inferiority of other groups on the basis of ancestry and often immutable traits, traits that would be neutral in the abstract but are ascribed life-and-death meaning.”

“As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance,” Wilkerson writes. She observes that caste “is about respect, authority and assumptions of competence — who is accorded these and who is not.”

Wilkerson’s usages neatly lift the mind out of old ruts. They enable her to make unsettling comparisons between India’s treatment of its untouchables, or Dalits, Nazi Germany’s treatment of Jews and America’s treatment of African-Americans. Each country “relied on stigmatizing those deemed inferior to justify the dehumanization necessary to keep the lowest-ranked people at the bottom and to rationalize the protocols of enforcement.”

Wilkerson does not shy from the brutality that has gone hand in hand with this kind of dehumanization. As if pulling from a deep reservoir, she always has a prime example at hand. It takes resolve and a strong stomach to stare at the particulars, rather than the generalities, of lives under slavery and Jim Crow and recent American experience. To feel the heat of the furnace of individual experience. It’s the kind of resolve Americans will require more of.

“Caste” gets off to an uncertain start. Its first pages summon, in dystopian-novel fashion, the results of the 2016 election alongside anthrax trapped in the permafrost being released into the atmosphere because of global warming. Wilkerson is making a point about old poisons returning to haunt us. But by pulling in global warming (a subject she never returns to in any real fashion) so early in her book, you wonder if “Caste” will be a mere grab bag of nightmare impressions.

Her consideration of the 2016 election, and American politics in general, is sobering. To anyone who imagined that the election of Barack Obama was a sign that America had begun to enter a post-racial era, she reminds us that the majority of whites did not vote for him.

She poses the question so many intellectuals and pundits on the left have posed, with increasing befuddlement: Why do the white working classes in America vote against their economic interests?

She runs further with the notion of white resentment than many commentators have been willing to, and the juices of her argument follow the course of her knife. What these pundits had not considered, Wilkerson writes, “was that the people voting this way were, in fact, voting their interests. Maintaining the caste system as it had always been was in their interest. And some were willing to accept short-term discomfort, forgo health insurance, risk contamination of the water and air, and even die to protect their long-term interest in the hierarchy as they had known it.”

In her novel “Americanah,” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie suggested that “maybe it’s time to just scrap the word ‘racist.’ Find something new. Like Racial Disorder Syndrome. And we could have different categories for sufferers of this syndrome: mild, medium and acute.”

Wilkerson has written a closely argued book that largely avoids the word “racism,” yet stares it down with more humanity and rigor than nearly all but a few books in our literature.

“Caste” deepens our tragic sense of American history. It reads like watching the slow passing of a long and demented cortege. In its suggestion that we need something akin to South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, her book points the way toward an alleviation of alienation. It’s a book that seeks to shatter a paralysis of will. It’s a book that changes the weather inside a reader.

While reading “Caste,” I thought often of a pair of sentences from Colson Whitehead’s novel “The Underground Railroad.” “The Declaration [of Independence] is like a map,” he wrote. “You trust that it’s right, but you only know by going out and testing it for yourself.”


Watch the video: Ли сбегает от Картера - Час пик 1998 - Момент из фильма (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Najas

    very excellent idea and it is timely

  2. Kajile

    Your topic is quite difficult for a beginner.



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