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USS Newport News CA-148 - History

USS Newport News CA-148 - History


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USS Newport News CA-148

Newport News II
(CA-148: dp. 20,980; 1. 717'6"; b. 76'6"; dr. 27'; s. 31.5k; cpl. 1,667; a. 9 8", 12 5", 12 3"; cl. Des Moines)

The second Newport News (CA-148), a heavy cruiser, was laid down 1 November 1945; launched on 6 March 1948 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Newport News, Virginia; sponsored by Mrs. Homer T. Ferguson, commissioned 29 January 1949, Captain Roland N. Smoot commanding.

In addition to annual deployments to the Mediterranean from 1950 to 1961 for duty with the Sixth Fleet, she participated in major fleet exercises and midshipman training cruises in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic. In early September 1957, Newport News was on station in the Eastern Mediterranean in preparation for any contingency during the Syrian crisis. In March 1960, while steaming 75 miles northeast of Sicily, Newport News was ordered to proceed to Agadir, Moroceo, to render assistance to the survivors of that earthquake shattered city. She steamed 1,225 miles in 40.5 hours at an average speed of 31 knots, arriving on 3 March to provide medical and material aid. With the assassination of General Trujillo and the resulting instability in Santo Domingo, Newport News was underway on short notice on 4 June 1961, and proceeded to a station in international waters off the Dominican Republic to await further orders. When the crisis terminated, the ship returned to Norfolk after conducting training exercises off Puerto Rico.

Newport News' berthing and communications facilities were mod)fied in the winter of 1962 to aceomodate Commander

Second Fleet and his staff. In August 1962, she participated in NATO Exereise RIPTIDE III, and upon the end of the exercise, made a month long tour of Northern European ports as flagship of ComStrikFltLant, the NATO role of Commander Second Fleet.

Within a month after return to Norfolk, Newport News was underway on 22 October along with other units of the Atlantic Fleet for the Cuban Quarantinc. For the next mobth acting as flagship for ComSecondFlt, CA-148 was on station northeast of Cuba. When the Soviet MRBM's were dismantled and removed from Cuba, Newport News assisted in the missile count. Upon cancellation of the quarantine, she returned to her homeport of Norfolk the day before Thanksgiving.

Operations from 1963 through 1967 consisted primarily of NATO exercises in the North Atlantic, gunnery and amphibious exercises off the Eastern seaboard and Caribbean, and midshipman cruises. When the Dominican Republic crisis of 1965 developed, Newport News sortied from Norfolk on 29 April for Santo Domingo, where she was flagship for Commander Joint Task Force 122. Newport News remained on station off Santo Domingo until 7 May 1965 when JTF 122 was dissolved, and command was shifted to the Army ashore in the Dominican Republic. She returned to Norfolk, where in June alterations were made to increase her combat eapabilities.

1 September 1967, Commander Second Fleet shifted his flag to Springfield, and Newport News departed Norfolk 5 September for a six month deployment to South East Asia. Arriving Da Nang, South Vietnam, on the morning of 9 October, she became thc flagship of ComCruDesFlot 3. That night, at 2300, she fired her eight inch rifles for the first time in anger against shore targets in North Vietnam as part of "operation Sea Dragon". For years her powerful guns had served as a major force to keep the peace. Now her strength
served well in war during the following months in providing interdiction fire north of the Demilitarized Zone and naval gunfire support for American allied troops in South Vietnam.

The cruiser departed Subic Bay 21 April and arrived at her homeport of Norfolk 13 May 1968, via the Panama Canal.


USS Newport News CA-148 - History

Newport News II
(CA-148: dp. 20,980 1. 717'6" b. 76'6" dr. 27' s. 31.5k cpl. 1,667 a. 9 8", 12 5", 12 3" cl. Des Moines)

The second Newport News (CA-148), a heavy cruiser, was laid down 1 November 1945 launched on 6 March 1948 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company Newport News, Virginia sponsored by Mrs. Homer T. Ferguson, commissioned 29 January 1949, Captain Roland N. Smoot commanding.

In addition to annual deployments to the Mediterranean from 1950 to 1961 for duty with the Sixth Fleet, she participated in major fleet exercises and midshipman training cruises in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic. In early September 1957, Newport News was on station in the Eastern Mediterranean in preparation for any contingency during the Syrian crisis. In March 1960, while steaming 75 miles northeast of Sicily, Newport News was ordered to proceed to Agadir, Moroceo, to render assistance to the survivors of that earthquake shattered city. She steamed 1,225 miles in 40.5 hours at an average speed of 31 knots, arriving on 3 March to provide medical and material aid. With the assassination of General Trujillo and the resulting instability in Santo Domingo, Newport News was underway on short notice on 4 June 1961, and proceeded to a station in international waters off the Dominican Republic to await further orders. When the crisis terminated, the ship returned to Norfolk after conducting training exercises off Puerto Rico.

Newport News' berthing and communications facilities were mod)fied in the winter of 1962 to aceomodate Commander

Second Fleet and his staff. In August 1962, she participated in NATO Exereise RIPTIDE III, and upon the end of the exercise, made a month long tour of Northern European ports as flagship of ComStrikFltLant, the NATO role of Commander Second Fleet.

Within a month after return to Norfolk, Newport News was underway on 22 October along with other units of the Atlantic Fleet for the Cuban Quarantinc. For the next mobth acting as flagship for ComSecondFlt, CA-148 was on station northeast of Cuba. When the Soviet MRBM's were dismantled and removed from Cuba, Newport News assisted in the missile count. Upon cancellation of the quarantine, she returned to her homeport of Norfolk the day before Thanksgiving.

Operations from 1963 through 1967 consisted primarily of NATO exercises in the North Atlantic, gunnery and amphibious exercises off the Eastern seaboard and Caribbean, and midshipman cruises. When the Dominican Republic crisis of 1965 developed, Newport News sortied from Norfolk on 29 April for Santo Domingo, where she was flagship for Commander Joint Task Force 122. Newport News remained on station off Santo Domingo until 7 May 1965 when JTF 122 was dissolved, and command was shifted to the Army ashore in the Dominican Republic. She returned to Norfolk, where in June alterations were made to increase her combat eapabilities.

1 September 1967, Commander Second Fleet shifted his flag to Springfield, and Newport News departed Norfolk 5 September for a six month deployment to South East Asia. Arriving Da Nang, South Vietnam, on the morning of 9 October, she became thc flagship of ComCruDesFlot 3. That night, at 2300, she fired her eight inch rifles for the first time in anger against shore targets in North Vietnam as part of "operation Sea Dragon". For years her powerful guns had served as a major force to keep the peace. Now her strength
served well in war during the following months in providing interdiction fire north of the Demilitarized Zone and naval gunfire support for American allied troops in South Vietnam.

The cruiser departed Subic Bay 21 April and arrived at her homeport of Norfolk 13 May 1968, via the Panama Canal.


USS Newport News Reunion Information

Note to new shipmates:
If this is your first reunion, you're in for a real treat. a chance to (legally) step back into uniform and man the rails of one of the first guided missile cruisers. Regulations permit honorably discharged veterans to wear uniforms when attending memorials and similar, and we do just that.

Because few of us fit into our old bell bottoms and white hats, we have adopted a simple uniform: white short-sleeved shirt, white pants, white web belt, Newport News (blue) ball cap (available in the ship's store) and rate/rank and medals as appropriate. Frankly, we look pretty sharp. bald heads, pot bellies, canes, crutches, walkers, and wheelchairs. It's a proud thing to step back into uniform, however briefly.

Uniform pants and shirts are readily available at surplus stores for a few dollars, or new ones available online. A few actually do fit into their old uniforms, and can still wear them proudly. So we tell you sincerely: If you don't man the rails in uniform, you will leave the reunion wishing you had.

You are part of our Band of Brothers. join us in uniform as we honor our fallen brothers together.


USS Newport News CA-148

At 0100 hours on October 1, 1972, the USS Newport News was firing a support mission off the coast of South Vietnam. An 8 inch projectile jammed in the center gun of Turret Two. The subsequent implosion and fire killed 20 crewmembers and injured 36 others. It is to our fallen shipmates who gave their lives for their country that this memorial is respectfully dedicated by the USS Newport News Reunion Association. They will be with us in spirit forever.

Erected by USS Newport News Reunion Association.

Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, Vietnam. A significant historical month for this entry is October 1917.

Location. 36° 50.918′ N, 76° 17.663′ W. Marker is in Norfolk, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Brooke Avenue and Harbour Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Norfolk VA 23510, United States of America. Touch for directions.

Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Pentagon (here, next to this marker) USS Kearsarge (CV-33) (here, next to this marker) USS Belknap (CG 26) (here, next to this marker) USS Iowa (BB-61) (here, next to this marker) USS Cole (DDG 67) (here, next to this marker) USS Nimitz (CVN-68) (here, next to this marker) USS Scorpion (SSN-589)

(here, next to this marker) USS Liberty AGTR-5 (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Norfolk.

Also see . . . USS Newport News (CA-148). [Wikipedia] The second USS Newport News (CA�) was a Des Moines-class heavy cruiser in the United States Navy. Newport News was laid down 1 November 1945 launched on 6 March 1948 by Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia. The vessel was sponsored by Mrs. Homer L. Ferguson upon commissioning on 29 January 1949, Captain Roland N. Smoot commanding. She was the first air-conditioned surface ship in the United States Navy. (Submitted on October 17, 2011, by Sandra Hughes Tidwell of Killen, Alabama, USA.)


NEWPORT NEWS CA 148

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Des Moines Class Heavy Cruiser
    Keel Laid 1 November 1945 - Launched 6 March 1948

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.


USS Newport News CA-148 - History

USS Newport News, CA-148.
US Navy Heavy Cruiser

This section is a reprint from an article describing the building of my radio control model of the USS Newport News, published in the March & May 1996 issues of "Scale Ship Model" Magazine. Click on the anchor icon to enter each page.

Chapter 1 Introduction.

Introduction of article Background and history of the USS Newport News A little talk about the most important secrets of building great scale models and having fun at the same time. A bit about the research involved before starting this model. Then getting started by laying and building the frame work. Plus a couple of pictures.

Chapter 2 Power, Electronics, Deck.

The electronics and power system that filled the hull's interior. Building the deck and superstructure. The lighting system for this model. Building the gun turret then making them look damaged. Adding detail to the ship to make it look real. Selecting, modifying and painting figures to look like sailors working on board. And yes, Pictures. A couple of close ups showing the detail and crew members working on the damage Turret. The nightmare of installing the railing, the madness of painting the model and a few closing notes.

Chapter 3 Pictures of Newport News Model.

17 Black & white thumbnail pictures, showing different stages of the building process. Click on any B&W .jpg and you will get a large color picture of that picture.

Home page for the US Navy, Heave Cruiser, USS Newport News.

A Place to learn about the US Navy Heavy Cruiser, USS NEWPORT NEWS CA-148, that the above model was made to represent. Crew members pages where for old shipmates to get together. Also pictures and history of this famous Navy Combat Ship.

Return to my Home Page.

USS Newport News, CA-148
(radio control model)


You are visitor number This Page created on May 11, 1996


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First of all Please READ and FOLLOW our few rule's:

**If you don't answer the questions as to your connection to the USS Newport News CA-148 you WILL NOT be able to join us. period

**Please make use of … Ещё the PERSONAL MESSAGE feature rather than posting off the cuff, off topic ie: politics / religion, or derogatory comments to or about another NN Shipmate, Speak with them directly, or bite your tongue.

**If you'd like to talk to other members about anything unrelated to the USS Newport News feel free to join our 'anything goes' group at:

Only those persons who have a DIRECT CONNECTION to the USS Newport News CA-148 will be accepted to be a member in this group. Those accepted will be:
1- Former Ships Crew
2- Family Members of Ships Crew
3- Former Crew Members of the Newport News Sister Ships The USS Des Moines CA-134 and the USS Salem CA-139


** If you'd like to purchase "USS Newport News CA-148" merchandise and avoid cheap "knock-off" products, PLEASE do so through OUR ship's store at:
https:// ussnewportnewsst ore.org/
doing so helps support OUR Ships Reunion Foundation, Museum, web site upkeep, and any other "Official" USS Newport News CA-148 campaign, event, etc. While it's fresh on your mind, please consider a monetary donation as well. Let's keep your hard earned $$ in the Newport News CA-148 Family, Thank You and Hand Salute. 2
. . . . . .

Honoring the Heavy Cruiser USS Newport News CA-148 and all who walked Her Decks.
This Group is open to anyone who served aboard the USS Newport News CA-148

Feel free to share your photo's, video's, event's and stories (NN related) of your tour of Duty aboard the Greatest Heavy Cruiser to ever sail the Sea's. The Discussion Board is open for direct communication with other Members. If there isn't a topic you'd like to discuss. start one (NN related)! This is YOUR Group. enjoy it as much as I did creating it!

**If you have any 'off topic' concerns, or would like to share other content with members that is NOT related to the USS Newport News visit our 'anything goes' group at:
https:// www.facebook.com /groups/ 2053292528042501 /


Bill Gowacki
Group Founder
T3 2nd Div. Jan. ྅ June ྇


USS Newport News CA-148

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USS Newport News CA-148 (1948-1975)

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USS Newport News (CA-148) - 1963–1974

Operations from 1963 through 1967 consisted primarily of NATO exercises in the North Atlantic, gunnery and amphibious exercises off the Eastern seaboard and Caribbean, and midshipman cruises. When the Dominican Republic crisis of 1965 developed, Newport News sortied from Norfolk on 29 April for Santo Domingo, where she was flagship for Commander Joint Task Force 122. Newport News remained on station off Santo Domingo until 7 May 1965 when JTF 122 was dissolved, and command was shifted to the Army ashore in the Dominican Republic. She returned to Norfolk, where in June alterations were made to increase her combat capabilities. On June 28, 1965, Newport News entered the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Va. for a five month period of refitting and overhaul, a regular part of the life cycle of a warship. Shakedown was in Guantanamo, Cuba, over Christmas and New Year of 1965. It was no picnic, as those who were there can attest to. "Combat ready" was a way of life, sometimes more than 10 hours at a time. Swimming, softball, and drinking were the favorite pastimes. Upon her return from Gitmo, Newport News once again became Flagship for Second Fleet, Vice Admiral Masterson taking command.

1 September 1967, Commander Second Fleet shifted his flag to Springfield, and Newport News departed Norfolk 5 September for a six month deployment to Southeast Asia. Arriving Da Nang, South Vietnam, on the morning of 9 October, she became the flagship of ComCruDesFlot 3. That night, at 2300, under her new call sign "Thunder," she fired her eight inch rifles for the first time in anger against shore targets in North Vietnam as part of Operation Sea Dragon.

Newport News spent some 50 days patrolling the coast of North Vietnam as part of Operation Sea Dragon – the Navy’s effort to destroy waterborne logistics craft as well as military supply routes ashore in North Vietnam. During this period, the ship conducted 156 strikes against enemy targets and, in the execution of these strikes, 325 North Vietnamese coastal defense sites were taken under fire. Combined, 7411 rounds of high explosive ammunition were expended by the ship during Operation Sea Dragon. According to spotters’ reports, Newport News sank 17 waterborne logistics craft, damaged another 14 and destroyed several enemy bunker and radar sites. In harassment and interdiction strike missions she all but halted the enemy’s rebuilding efforts as she damaged bridges, barges, trucks and roads and caused heavy ruin and raging fires in widespread areas. The ship was subjected to hostile fire on several occasions, but each time countered effectively and silenced the enemy batteries. On 19 December 1967, Newport News exchanged fire with 20–28 separate shore batteries, simultaneously, off the coast of North Vietnam. During the short period of this engagement, over 300 enemy rounds bracketed the cruiser’s position, but ship handling by Captain McCarty prevented any direct hits. This encounter led American forward observers to nickname Newport News “The Gray Ghost from the East Coast,” a moniker she retained throughout her three Vietnam deployments.

Subsequent to the end of Operation Sea Dragon and for the remaining several months of this deployment, Newport News participated in Naval Gunfire Support operations near the DMZ (The Demilitarized Zone). In support of Third Marine Division forces on the beach, the ship fired around the clock for periods sometimes lasting several weeks in succession. On station near the DMZ, Newport News was normally in sight of land and crewmembers could frequently see and hear, first hand, the effect of their efforts on enemy positions.

During the total period of this deployment, Newport News expended a record 59,241 rounds of high-explosive ammunition, while conducting a total of 239 observed and 602 unobserved missions against the enemy. She came under fire of enemy coastal defense batteries on seventeen separate occasions, was frequently straffed with shrapnel, but never suffering a direct hit.

The cruiser departed Subic Bay on 21 April and arrived at her homeport of Norfolk, Virginia on 13 May 1968, via the Panama Canal.

Following an extensive yard overhaul period to prepare her for further combat operations, on 21 November 1968 Newport News once again departed Norfolk to commence her second deployment to Vietnam. Combat operations during this second tour commenced on 25 December 1968, focused primarily on providing Naval Gunfire Support to the 7th and 9th ARVN in the Vinh Binh Province of the Mekong Delta and on providing additional Naval Gunfire Support near the DMZ. Newport News expended 18,928 rounds of ammunition during this second Vietnam deployment, departing Da Nang, South Vietnam on 3 June 1969, via San Francisco and the Panama Canal, to arrive at her homeport in Norfolk, Virginia in early July of that year.

In May 1972 Newport News returned to the gunline for her third combat tour in WESTPAC. During the summer of 1972 the ship, along with the guided missile cruisers USS Oklahoma City, and USS Providence (as well as several screening destroyers including the USS Hanson) took part in a high speed night bombardment of Haiphong harbor. Known as the Three Cruiser Raid, it was the last time a major shore bombardment would be undertaken by multiple large (cruiser sized) ships.

On 1 October 1972, while in action off the Demilitarized Zone in Vietnam, Newport News sustained an in-bore explosion in her center 8-inch gun of number two turret. A defective auxiliary detonating fuse caused the projectile to detonate almost immediately upon firing. Twenty men were killed and thirty six injured. The barrel proper was blown forward from the gun. The damaged gun was removed and its port plated over. The explosion had caused extensive damage to the center gun mount. There had been a complete spare gun assembly in the supply system but it had been scraped. It was proposed to replace the damaged mount with one from Des Moines (CA-134) or Salem (CA-139), who were decommissioned, but this was rejected as being too expensive. As a result, the damage was not repaired and the turret was simply closed off. The ship completed her career with the turret unusable and locked in train.

Operations near Vietnam continued until December 1972 when the ship was recalled to Norfolk. During 1973 and 1974 the ship undertook training cruises and visited many ports around the world before being recalled for decommissioning, after a survey to determine further service indicated the ship was beyond refitting.


USS Newport News Reunion Information

Note to new shipmates:
If this is your first reunion, you're in for a real treat. a chance to (legally) step back into uniform and man the rails of one of the first guided missile cruisers. Regulations permit honorably discharged veterans to wear uniforms when attending memorials and similar, and we do just that.

Because few of us fit into our old bell bottoms and white hats, we have adopted a simple uniform: white short-sleeved shirt, white pants, white web belt, Newport News (blue) ball cap (available in the ship's store) and rate/rank and medals as appropriate. Frankly, we look pretty sharp. bald heads, pot bellies, canes, crutches, walkers, and wheelchairs. It's a proud thing to step back into uniform, however briefly.

Uniform pants and shirts are readily available at surplus stores for a few dollars, or new ones available online. A few actually do fit into their old uniforms, and can still wear them proudly. So we tell you sincerely: If you don't man the rails in uniform, you will leave the reunion wishing you had.

You are part of our Band of Brothers. join us in uniform as we honor our fallen brothers together.


Watch the video: MY SHIP FIRED ON BY NVA COASTAL GUN BATTERIES (May 2022).