News

World’s Oldest Pearl Found in Abu Dhabi is 8,000-Years-Old!

World’s Oldest Pearl Found in Abu Dhabi is 8,000-Years-Old!


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Archaeologists in Abu Dhabi have found an 8,000-year-old pearl - the world’s most ancient specimen.

According to Emirati archaeologists the exquisite natural pearl is proof that valuable objects have been traded since Neolithic times. The pearl was dug up during excavations at Marawah Island, off the capital of the United Arab Emirates , and it will be displayed for first time publicly in the exhibition 10,000 Years of Luxury , opening on October 30th at the Louvre Abu Dhabi.

The Marawah site is one of the oldest sites in the country and is made up of numerous collapsed Neolithic stone structures which have yielded ceramics, beads made from shell, and stone and flint arrowheads. But Mohamed al-Muabarak, the chairman of Abu Dhabi’s department of culture and tourism, told the press that the layers from which the pearl came have been carbon dated to “5,800 – 5,600 BC,” which is why it is being hailed the oldest pearl in the world.

Marawah site, where the pearl was discovered. ( Archaeology.org)

Pearls In The Ancient World

With the world’s most ancient pearl dating to 5,600 BC Pearl-Guide.com will need updating, for at the moment it says pearls have been prized and collected “for more than 4,000 years”. In ancient Egypt, mother-of-pearl was used for decorative purposes as far back as 4,000 BC and Chinese records determine they were prized possessions and gifts of royalty, and in India ancient Hindu texts refer to the god Krishna discovering the first pearl.

  • Fingerprints of Ancient Masons Reveal Advanced Iron Age Construction Technique
  • Curse of the Buried Pearl: Ancient Magick and the Many Hazards of Treasure Hunting – Part II
  • Who Were the Mysterious Neolithic People That Enabled the Rise of Ancient Egypt?

Hindu mythology says the god Krishna discovered the first pearl. (Virumandi1 / CC BY-SA 4.0 )

According to Khanacademy the ancient Sumerian civilization formed in southern Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) around 4,000 BC and had developed the first written scripts around 3,000 BC including The Epic of Gilgamesh . Ancient Sumerians are known to have sailed in the Persian Gulf where they traded goods with the Harappans in northern India including textiles, leather goods, and jewelry in return for Harappan copper and semi-precious stones including ivory and pearls.

Ancient Sumerians traded in luxury goods such as jewelry and pearls in Mesopotamia. ( पाटलिपुत्र)

Ancient Freediving For Treasures

In Peter Roger and Stuart Moorey’s 1999 book Ancient Mesopotamian Materials and Industries: The Archaeological Evidence we are told that a small string of pearls from the late prehistoric horizon remained an “isolated find” and that these pearls are suspected to have been obtained from Oman. However, Emirati archaeological experts at the culture department pointed out that the Venetian jewel merchant Gasparo Balbi , who traveled through the region in the 16th century, mentioned the islands off the coast of Abu Dhabi as a “source of pearls”.

The remaining question is where and how on earth did ancient people find and collect pearls? According to a report of FreeDivingUAE people were actively engaged in the search for pearls in Mesopotamia “in 4,500 BC” after archaeologists found decorative objects with pearls which they say could “only be obtained from the seabed” confirming that there were professional pearl divers a very, very long time ago.

While we will never know exactly when people began to dive deep for pearls most likely people started freediving in order to catch food and then, learning that some shells have pearls, freediving became a way to obtain unique treasures that couldn’t be found on the shores and beaches.

The Perils Of Collecting Pearls

Pearl divers have always been faced with a list of life endangering variables including the very real threat of shark attacks as well as the crippling effects of the dreaded “bends” which can strike at any time. Goodness knows what it must have been like in prehistoric times but in the late 19th century and early 20th century, pearl divers mortality rates was as high as 50% and today there are strict protocols and regulations regarding occupational pearl diving to reduce these risks.

Pearl divers face great risks. ( yossarian6 / Adobe Stock)

While the pearl about to go on display at the Louvre Abu Dhabi is the world’s oldest, it has some growing to do to rival the size and esteem of what is known as the world’s most famous pearl. A National Geographic article discussing “La Peregrina” (Spanish for ‘the incomparable’) features a 500 year-old pear shaped pearl which is the size of “a large pigeon’s egg” which was previously owned by a king of Spain, Napoleon Bonaparte, and the actress Elizabeth Taylor and is valued at over $100 million dollars.


Pearl claimed as world's oldest is to be exhibited in Abu Dhabi

An 8,000-year-old pearl that archaeologists say is the world’s most ancient is to be displayed in Abu Dhabi, according to authorities who said it was proof that the objects have been traded since neolithic times.

The natural pearl was found during excavations at Marawah Island, off the capital of the United Arab Emirates, that revealed the earliest architecture yet found in the country.

“The layers from which the pearl came have been carbon dated to 5800-5600BC,” said the chairman of Abu Dhabi’s department of culture and tourism, Mohamed al-Muabarak.

“The discovery of the oldest pearl in the world in Abu Dhabi makes it clear that so much of our recent economic and cultural history has deep roots that stretch back to the dawn of prehistory.”

The excavation of the Marawah site, which is made up of numerous collapsed neolithic stone structures, has also yielded ceramics, beads made from shell and stone, and flint arrowheads.

The pearl will be shown for the first time in the exhibition 10,000 Years of Luxury, opening on 30 October at the Louvre Abu Dhabi.

Emirati experts believe that the pearls were traded with people from Mesopotamia – ancient Iraq – in exchange for ceramics and other goods. They were probably also worn as jewellery.

“The Venetian jewel merchant Gasparo Balbi, who travelled through the region, mentions the islands off the coast of Abu Dhabi as a source of pearls in the 16th century,” the culture department said.

The pearl industry once underpinned the economy of the UAE but the trade collapsed in the 1930s with the advent of Japanese cultured pearls and as conflicts rocked global economies.


World’s oldest pearl found in Abu Dhabi

Abu Dhabi (AFP) – An 8,000-year-old pearl that archaeologists say is the world’s oldest will be displayed in Abu Dhabi, according to authorities who said Sunday it is proof the objects have been traded since Neolithic times.

The natural pearl was found in the floor of a room discovered during excavations at Marawah Island, off the capital of the United Arab Emirates, which revealed the earliest architecture found in the country.

“The layers from which the pearl came have been carbon dated to 5800-5600 BC, during the Neolithic period,” Abu Dhabi’s Department of Culture and Tourism said.

“The discovery of the oldest pearl in the world in Abu Dhabi makes it clear that so much of our recent economic and cultural history has deep roots that stretch back to the dawn of prehistory,” said its chairman Mohamed Al-Muabarak.

The excavation of the Marawah site, which is made up of numerous collapsed Neolithic stone structures, has also yielded ceramics, beads made from shell and stone, and flint arrowheads.

The “Abu Dhabi Pearl” will be shown for the first time in the exhibition 󈫺,000 years of Luxury” which is opening on October 30 at the Louvre Abu Dhabi — the outpost of the famous Paris museum.

Emirati experts believe that the pearls were traded with Mesopotamia — ancient Iraq — in exchange for ceramics and other goods. They were also likely worn as jewellery.

“The Venetian jewel merchant Gasparo Balbi, who travelled through the region, mentions the islands off the coast of Abu Dhabi as a source of pearls in the 16th century,” the culture department said.

The pearl industry once underpinned the economy of the United Arab Emirates, but the trade collapsed in the 1930s with the advent of Japanese cultured pearls, and as conflicts rocked global economies.

Instead, the Gulf nations turned to the oil industry which dominates their economies to this day.


World’s Oldest Pearl Found in Abu Dhabi

A handout picture released by the Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi on October 20, 2019, shows a pearl recovered from an archeological site in on Marawah Island. (Photo by – / Abu Dhabi Department of Culture and Tourism / AFP) /

An 8,000-year-old pearl that archaeologists say is the worlds oldest will be displayed in Abu Dhabi, according to authorities who said Sunday it is proof the objects have been traded since Neolithic times.

The natural pearl was found in the floor of a room discovered during excavations at Marawah Island, off the capital of the United Arab Emirates, which revealed the earliest architecture found in the country.

“The layers from which the pearl came have been carbon-dated to 5800-5600 BC, during the Neolithic period,” Abu Dhabi’s Department of Culture and Tourism said.

“The discovery of the oldest pearl in the world in Abu Dhabi makes it clear that so much of our recent economic and cultural history has deep roots that stretch back to the dawn of prehistory,” said its chairman Mohamed Al-Muabarak.

The excavation of the Marawah site, which is made up of numerous collapsed Neolithic stone structures, has also yielded ceramics, beads made from shell and stone, and flint arrowheads.

The “Abu Dhabi Pearl” will be shown for the first time in the exhibition 󈫺,000 years of Luxury” which is opening on October 30 at the Louvre Abu Dhabi — the outpost of the famous Paris museum.

Emirati experts believe that the pearls were traded with Mesopotamia — ancient Iraq — in exchange for ceramics and other goods. They were also likely worn as jewellery.

“The Venetian jewel merchant Gasparo Balbi, who travelled through the region, mentions the islands off the coast of Abu Dhabi as a source of pearls in the 16th century,” the culture department said.

The pearl industry once underpinned the economy of the United Arab Emirates, but the trade collapsed in the 1930s with the advent of Japanese cultured pearls, and as conflicts rocked global economies.

Instead, the Gulf nations turned to the oil industry which dominates their economies to this day.


World's oldest pearl found in Abu Dhabi

An 8,000-year-old pearl that archeologist say is the world's oldest will be displayed in Abu Dhabi, according to authorities who said Sunday it is proof the objects have been traded since Neolithic times.

The natural pearl was found in the floor of a room discovered during excavations at Marawah Island, off the capital of the United Arab Emirates, which revealed the earliest architecture found in the country.

"The layers from which the pearl came have been carbon dated to 5800-5600 BC, during the Neolithic period," Abu Dhabi's Department of Culture and Tourism said.

"The discovery of the oldest pearl in the world in Abu Dhabi makes it clear that so much of our recent economic and cultural history has deep roots that stretch back to the dawn of prehistory," said its chairman Mohamed Al-Muabarak.

The excavation of the Marawah site, which is made up of numerous collapsed Neolithic stone structures, has also yielded ceramics, beads made from shell and stone, and flint arrowheads.

The "Abu Dhabi Pearl" will be shown for the first time in the exhibition "10,000 years of Luxury" which is opening on October 30 at the Louvre Abu Dhabi -- the outpost of the famous Paris museum.

Emirati experts believe that the pearls were traded with Mesopotamia -- ancient Iraq -- in exchange for ceramics and other goods. They were also likely worn as jewellery.

"The Venetian jewel merchant Gasparo Balbi, who travelled through the region, mentions the islands off the coast of Abu Dhabi as a source of pearls in the 16th century," the culture department said.

The pearl industry once underpinned the economy of the United Arab Emirates, but the trade collapsed in the 1930s with the advent of Japanese cultured pearls, and as conflicts rocked global economies.

Instead, the Gulf nations turned to the oil industry which dominates their economies to this day.


  • The pearl was found during Neolithic excavations on the UAE's Marawah Island
  • The gemstone will go on display at the Abu Dhabi Louvre from October 31, 2019
  • Experts believe that such pearls were also traded in exchange for other goods
  • The dig site has also yielded ceramics, flint arrowheads and decorative beads

Published: 13:58 BST, 20 October 2019 | Updated: 13:35 BST, 21 October 2019

The world's oldest pearl is to go on display in Abu Dhabi as experts say that the 8,000-year-old gemstone is proof that jewellery has been traded since the Neolithic.

The natural pearl was found in the floor of a room discovered during excavations on Marawah Island, of off the capital of the United Arab Emirates.

The digs revealed the earliest architecture ever found in the country.

'The layers from which the pearl came have been carbon dated to 5800-5600 BC, during the Neolithic period,' Abu Dhabi's Culture and Tourism Authority said.

Archaeologists say the 8,000-year-old pearl found during a dig in Abu Dhabi is the oldest in the world

HOW DO PEARLS FORM?

Pearls are formed inside the shells of certain molluscs.

The marine creatures secrete aragonite — a mineral made of calcium carbonate — and a complex protein to enclose irritants that enter their shells.

These materials form nacre layers that build up into a pearl.

While it is commonly thought that sand grains trigger this process, the irritant is typically a parasite of piece of organic material.

Pearls can also be cultured by deliberately inserting an irritant into the mollusc's shell.

'The discovery of the oldest pearl in the world in Abu Dhabi makes it clear that so much of our recent economic and cultural history has deep roots that stretch back to the dawn of prehistory,' said authority chairman Mohamed Al-Muabarak.

The excavation of the Marawah site — which is made up of numerous collapsed Neolithic stone structures — has also yielded ceramics, flint arrowheads and beads made from both shells and stones.

The so-called 'Abu Dhabi Pearl' will be shown for the first time in the exhibition '10,000 years of Luxury', which is opening on October 30 at the Louvre Abu Dhabi — an outpost of the famous Parisian museum.

Emirati experts believe that the pearls were traded with Mesopotamia — what is today Iraq — in exchange for ceramics and other goods.


World's oldest pearl found in Abu Dhabi

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates &mdash An 8,000-year-old pearl that archaeologists say is the world's oldest will be displayed in Abu Dhabi, according to authorities who said Sunday it is proof the objects have been traded since Neolithic times.

The natural pearl was found in the floor of a room discovered during excavations at Marawah Island, off the capital of the United Arab Emirates, which revealed the earliest architecture found in the country.

"The layers from which the pearl came have been carbon dated to 5800-5600 BC, during the Neolithic period," Abu Dhabi's Department of Culture and Tourism said.

"The discovery of the oldest pearl in the world in Abu Dhabi makes it clear that so much of our recent economic and cultural history has deep roots that stretch back to the dawn of prehistory," said its chairman Mohamed Al-Muabarak.

The excavation of the Marawah site, which is made up of numerous collapsed Neolithic stone structures, has also yielded ceramics, beads made from shell and stone, and flint arrowheads.

The "Abu Dhabi Pearl" will be shown for the first time in the exhibition "10,000 years of Luxury" which is opening on October 30 at the Louvre Abu Dhabi -- the outpost of the famous Paris museum.

Emirati experts believe that the pearls were traded with Mesopotamia -- ancient Iraq -- in exchange for ceramics and other goods. They were also likely worn as jewellery.

"The Venetian jewel merchant Gasparo Balbi, who travelled through the region, mentions the islands off the coast of Abu Dhabi as a source of pearls in the 16th century," the culture department said.

The pearl industry once underpinned the economy of the United Arab Emirates, but the trade collapsed in the 1930s with the advent of Japanese cultured pearls, and as conflicts rocked global economies.

Instead, the Gulf nations turned to the oil industry which dominates their economies to this day.


The History Blog

The oldest pearl in the world is going on public display for the first time at the Louvre Abu Dhabi. It was discovered in 2017 at the site of a Neolithic settlement on Marawah Island off the western coast of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE). The pearl was radiocarbon dated to between 5800 and 5600 B.C. The lustrous natural pearl is less than three millimeters in diameter and is a pink in tone. It was found on the floor of a stone structure.

Mohamed Khalifa Al Mubarak, Chairman of [Department of Culture and Tourism] Abu Dhabi, said, “The Abu Dhabi Pearl is a stunning find, testimony to the ancient origins of our engagement with the sea. The discovery of the oldest pearl in the world in Abu Dhabi makes it clear that so much of our recent economic and cultural history has deep roots that stretch back to the dawn of prehistory. Marawah Island is one of our most valuable archaeological sites, and excavations continue in the hope of discovering even more evidence of how our ancestors lived, worked and thrived.” […]

The Neolithic sites on the island of Marawah were first identified in 1992 during a survey carried out by the Abu Dhabi Islands Archaeological Survey, ADIAS. Subsequent excavations have shown them to include numerous collapsed stone structures, the earliest architecture yet discovered in the UAE. Aside from the priceless Abu Dhabi Pearl, significant finds from the key Marawah site have included an imported ceramic vase from the ‘Ubaid civilisation in Mesopotamia (Iraq), beautifully worked flint arrowheads and shell and stone beads. Numerous painted plaster vessel fragments were also discovered and represent the earliest known decorative art yet discovered in the UAE. At the beginning of 2020, a major new excavation will take place to uncover more of the settlement.

To be clear, it’s not the oldest pearl ever formed. There are fossils of pearls dating back to the Cretaceous (145-65 million years ago). It’s their interaction with humans that is comparatively young, and little wonder given how well-concealed they are. The Abu Dhabi is the oldest known pearl found in an archaeological context and therefore the earliest known evidence of pearling anywhere in the world. The previous record-holder for oldest archaeological pearl, unearthed at a Neolithic site in Umm Al Quwain (also in the UAE) was radiocarbon dated to ca. 5500 B.C. That pearl was even smaller — about 1.7 mm in diameter — and was found in a burial placed above the upper lip of the deceased.

Diving for pearls was dangerous and difficult work, but pearls and mother-of-pearl objects have been found at multiple Neolithic sites on the Arabian Peninsula. The former had ritual and aesthetic value the latter was necessary to make fish hooks to catch large fish. Archaeologists believe they were also important trade items, bartered, for example, with Mesopotamia in exchange for decorative ceramics like the one found at Marawah. Pearling remained a crucial element of the economy of Arabian Gulf communities for thousands of years. Abu Dhabi was a center of traditional pearl diving and trade well into the 20th century.

The pearl will be part of the 10,000 Years of Luxury exhibition, the first museum exhibition dedicated to the history of luxury in the Middle East. It runs from October 30th through February 18th, 2020.

This entry was posted on Monday, October 21st, 2019 at 10:34 PM and is filed under Ancient. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can skip to the end and leave a response. Pinging is currently not allowed.


World’s Oldest Pearl Found in Abu Dhabi is 8,000-Years-Old! - History

The Marawah site is one of the oldest sites in the country

Archaeologists in Abu Dhabi have found an 8,000-year-old pearl – the world’s most ancient specimen.

According to Emirati archaeologists, the exquisite natural pearl is proof that valuable objects have been traded since Neolithic times. The pearl was dug up during excavations at Marawah Island, off the capital of the United Arab Emirates, and it will be displayed for the first time publicly in the exhibition 10,000 Years of Luxury, opening on October 30th at the Louvre Abu Dhabi.

The Marawah site is one of the oldest sites in the country and is made up of numerous collapsed Neolithic stone structures that have yielded ceramics, beads made from shell, and stone and flint arrowheads. But Mohamed al-Muabarak, the chairman of Abu Dhabi’s department of culture and tourism, told the press that the layers from which the pearl came have been carbon-dated to “5,800 – 5,600 BC,” which is why it is being hailed the oldest pearl in the world.


This 8,000-Year-Old Natural Pearl Found in Abu Dhabi is the World’s Oldest

Abu Dhabi: An 8,000-year-old pearl that archaeologists say is the world's oldest will be displayed in Abu Dhabi, according to authorities who said Sunday it is proof the objects have been traded since Neolithic times.

The natural pearl was found in the floor of a room discovered during excavations at Marawah Island, off the capital of the United Arab Emirates, which revealed the earliest architecture found in the country.

"The layers from which the pearl came have been carbon dated to 5800-5600 BC, during the Neolithic period," Abu Dhabi's Department of Culture and Tourism said.

"The discovery of the oldest pearl in the world in Abu Dhabi makes it clear that so much of our recent economic and cultural history has deep roots that stretch back to the dawn of prehistory," said its chairman Mohamed Al-Muabarak.

The excavation of the Marawah site, which is made up of numerous collapsed Neolithic stone structures, has also yielded ceramics, beads made from shell and stone, and flint arrowheads.

The "Abu Dhabi Pearl" will be shown for the first time in the exhibition "10,000 years of Luxury" which is opening on October 30 at the Louvre Abu Dhabi -- the outpost of the famous Paris museum.

Emirati experts believe that the pearls were traded with Mesopotamia -- ancient Iraq -- in exchange for ceramics and other goods. They were also likely worn as jewellery.

"The Venetian jewel merchant Gasparo Balbi, who travelled through the region, mentions the islands off the coast of Abu Dhabi as a source of pearls in the 16th century," the culture department said.

The pearl industry once underpinned the economy of the United Arab Emirates, but the trade collapsed in the 1930s with the advent of Japanese cultured pearls, and as conflicts rocked global economies. Instead, the Gulf nations turned to the oil industry which dominates their economies to this day.



Comments:

  1. Duc

    Just dare to do it one more time!

  2. Paolo

    All in good time.

  3. Zionah

    Where you so for a long time were gone?

  4. Nikonos

    I consider, what is it - error.

  5. Zulkijin

    I accept it with pleasure. An interesting topic, I will take part.



Write a message