News

No. 165 Squadron (RAF): Second World War

No. 165 Squadron (RAF): Second World War


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

No. 165 Squadron (RAF) during the Second World War

Aircraft - Locations - Group and Duty - Books

No.165 'Ceylon' Squadron was a home based fighter squadron that was operational from the spring of 1942 until the end of the Second World War. The squadron reformed on 6 April 1942 at Ayr, and was soon equipped with the Spitfire, becoming operational on defensive duties on 1 May 1942.

The squadron moved to the south east of England in August 1942 to take part in the disaster at Dieppe, and then took part in offensive sweeps over Northern France, before returning to Scotland in March 1943. The squadron returned to the south in July 1943 to join the Kenley Wing, where it provided bomber escorts for one month before moving to the south west.

From its new base the squadron took part in the build-up to D-Day, providing bomber escorts and convoy patrols as well as flying sweeps over north-west France.

After D-Day the squadron moved to Kent where it took part in the campaign against the V-1 flying bombs. In mid-December it moved again, this time to East Anglia where it converted to the Mustang. This was completed by February 1945 and the squadron began to fly long range bomber escort missions.

After the end of the war in Europe the squadron moved to Dyce where it converted to the Spitfire, before in mid June it moved to Norway. For the next six months it provided part of the air defence of Norway, before the Royal Norwegian Air Force was ready to return from exile and take over those duties. No.165 Squadron returned to the UK in January 1946 and was disbanded on 1 September 1946, with its aircraft going to No.66 Squadron.

Aircraft
April 1942-October 1943: Supermarine Spitfire VA and VB
October 1943-February 1945: Supermarine Spitfire IX
February-June 1945: North American Mustang III
June 1945-September 1946: Supermarine Spitfire IX

Location
April-August 1942: Ayr
August-November 1942: Gravesend
November 1942-March 1943: Tangmere
March-July 1943: Peterhead
July 1943: Ibsley
July-August 1943: Exeter
August-September 1943: Kenley
September 1943-February 1944: Culmhead
February-March 1944: Colerne
March-April 1944: Culmhead
April-June 1944: Predannack
June-July 1944: Detling
July-August 1944: Lympne
August-December 1944: Detling
December 1944-May 1945: Bentwaters
May-June 1945: Dyce
June 1945-January 1946: Vaernes
January 1946: Charterhouse
January-September 1946: Duxford

Squadron Codes: SK

Duty
1942-1945: Fighter Command

Part of
6 June 1944: No.10 Group; Air Defence of Great Britain; HQ Allied Expeditionary Air Force

Books

Bookmark this page: Delicious Facebook StumbleUpon


Announcements

  • The Wartime Memories Project has been running for 21 years. If you would like to support us, a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting and admin or this site will vanish from the web.
  • Looking for help with Family History Research? Please read our Family History FAQ's
  • The Wartime Memories Project is run by volunteers and this website is funded by donations from our visitors. If the information here has been helpful or you have enjoyed reaching the stories please conside making a donation, no matter how small, would be much appreciated, annually we need to raise enough funds to pay for our web hosting or this site will vanish from the web.

If you enjoy this site

please consider making a donation.

16th June 2021 - Please note we currently have a large backlog of submitted material, our volunteers are working through this as quickly as possible and all names, stories and photos will be added to the site. If you have already submitted a story to the site and your UID reference number is higher than 255865 your information is still in the queue, please do not resubmit without contacting us first.

We are now on Facebook. Like this page to receive our updates.

If you have a general question please post it on our Facebook page.


Squadron codes

No. 118 Squadron was a squadron of the British Royal Air Force. Originally formed in 1918, it served as a fighter squadron in the Second World War, flying Spitfires and Mustangs. It flew jet fighters as part of RAF Germany in the 1950s, and Bristol Sycamore helicopters in Northern Ireland before finally disbanding in 1962.

No. 331 Squadron RAF was a Second World War squadron of the Royal Air Force. The squadron was primarily manned with Norwegian aircrew. The squadron was part of Fighter Command between 1941 and March 1944 when it joined the 2nd Tactical Air Force until the end of the war. The squadron took part in the Dieppe Raid and the Normandy landings.

No. 603 Squadron is a squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, based in Edinburgh, Scotland. On reforming on 1 October 1999, the primary role of 603 Squadron, was as a Survive to Operate squadron, as well as providing Force Protection.

No. 310 Squadron RAF was a Czechoslovak-manned fighter squadron of the Royal Air Force in the Second World War.

No. 312 Squadron RAF was a Czechoslovak-manned fighter squadron of the Royal Air Force in the Second World War.

No. 257 Squadron RAF was a flying squadron of the Royal Air Force active during the First World War, the Second World War and also the Cold War. It was finally disbanded in December 1963.

No 263 Squadron was a Royal Air Force fighter squadron formed in Italy towards the end of the First World War. After being disbanded in 1919 it was reformed in 1939 flying mainly strike and heavy fighter aircraft until becoming No 1 Squadron in 1958.

No. 122 (Bombay) Squadron was a Royal Air Force fighter squadron during the First and Second World Wars.

349th Squadron is a fighter squadron in the Air Component of the Belgian Armed Forces. The squadron traces its origins to No. 349 (Belgian) Squadron of the Royal Air Force, founded in 1942 as part of the Free Belgian forces during World War II. It was transferred to the re-established Belgian Air Force in 1946, together with 350th Squadron. Considered a "honorary" squadron, it retained its original name and numbering and has been flying under the Belgian flag ever since. Today it is part of the 10th Tactical Wing, operating the F-16 Fighting Falcon from Kleine Brogel airbase.

No. 611 Squadron is a British Royal Air Force squadron. It was first formed in 1936 and was disbanded in 1957 after seeing combat as a fighter unit during the Second World War. It was reformed as a reserve squadron in 2013.

No. 274 Squadron RAF existed briefly in 1918 and 1919 as a patrol and bomber squadron, and served in World War II as a fighter squadron.

No. 243 Squadron was a flying squadron of the Royal Air Force. Originally formed in August 1918 from two flights that had been part of the Royal Naval Air Service, the squadron conducted anti-submarine patrols during the final stages of World War I. The squadron was later re-raised during World War II, operating initially as a fighter squadron in Malaya and Singapore during 1941󈞖. It was briefly disbanded just prior to the fall of Singapore, and was re-formed in mid-1942, again as a fighter squadron, and fought in the Tunisian and Italian campaigns in 1942󈞘, before being disbanded in October 1944. In 1945, after training on transport aircraft in Canada, the squadron moved to Australia where it operated in support of the British Pacific Fleet before disbanding in mid-1946.

No. 229 Squadron RAF was a squadron of the Royal Air Force, and is an officially accredited Battle of Britain Squadron. It became No. 603 Squadron RAF in January 1945.

No. 234 Squadron RAF had a long career within the RAF, being operational on flying boats in World War I and on fighter aircraft in World War II. After the war it remained a fighter unit till 1957. In its last incarnation the squadron was in turn Operational Training Unit (OTU), Tactical Weapon Unit (TWU) and part of No. 4 Flying Training School RAF until finally disbanded in 1994.

No. 248 Squadron was a squadron of the Royal Air Force, active immediately after World War I, and again during World War II.

No. 401 Tactical Fighter Squadron, a.k.a. "City of Westmount" Squadron, is a Royal Canadian Air Force squadron based at CFB Cold Lake. During World War II it was a fighter squadron and is notable for having fought in the Battle of Britain. Postwar, the squadron operated in Canada as an auxiliary squadron, reserve squadron and a helicopter and training squadron. In 2015 it was reactivated as a Tactical Fighter Squadron.

No. 129 (Mysore) Squadron was a Royal Air Force squadron active during World War II.

No 91 (Nigeria) Squadron was a squadron of the Royal Air Force but is no longer operational. The name acknowledges the contribution made by Nigeria to the cost of the squadron's aeroplanes.

No. 123 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was a British aircraft squadron in the First and Second World Wars.

No. 130 Squadron of the Royal Air Force was a Second World War and Cold war fighter squadron, and later a strategic missile squadron.


Watch the video: Sink the Bismarck. 1960 - FREE MOVIE! - Best Quality - WarDramaAction: With Subtitles (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Mylnburne

    It agrees, the message is very good

  2. Betlic

    And like him to understand

  3. Joanie

    The matchless message ;)

  4. Benwick

    In my opinion you are not right. Let's discuss. Write to me in PM, we will talk.

  5. Naif Na'il

    No, on the contrary.

  6. Wekesa

    I agree, but as you see there is a demand for tavar))

  7. Nanris

    In my opinion you have misled.



Write a message